Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Performance Reviews’

How To Discuss Poor Performance With An Employee

In Performance Appraisals, Performance Reviews on February 24, 2016 at 8:24 pm

As a leader, the time will come when you will have to speak with an employee about his or her poor performance. Here are six steps that will guide you through that process:

  1. Tell him what performance is in need of change and be specific.
  2. Tell him how his actions negatively affect the team.
  3. Let the discussion sink in.
  4. Set expectations of performance improvement and time frame, and get his agreement on the desired outcome.
  5. Remind him that he is a valuable part of the team and that you have confidence his performance will improve.
  6. Don’t rehash the discussion later. You made your point. Give him to make his improvement.

Six Guidelines For An Employee To Rank During A Performance Review

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Performance Reviews on November 2, 2014 at 10:04 am

Eric Jacobson

When you meet with your employee during her annual performance appraisal take time to determine what motivates her when it comes to her career development.  Motivation changes over time and changes depending on where the individual is in her career.

So, to determine what motives her, author Paul Falcone recommends you ask her to rank-order her priorities in terms of the following six guidelines:

  • If you had to chose two categories from the following six, which would you say hold the most significance to you career-wise?

1.  Career progression through the ranks and opportunities for promotion and advancement.

2.  Lateral assumption of increased job responsibilities and skill building (e.g. rotational assignments).

3.  Acquisition of new technical skills (typically requiring outside training and certification).

4.  Development of stronger leadership, managerial, or administrative skills.

5.  Work-life balance.

6.  Money and other forms of compensation.

Then, do your best to match her next year’s goals and objectives with projects, duties, assignments, activities, actions tied to what motivates her most.

You’ll find many more helpful tips in Falcone’s new book, 2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals.

How To Motivate Employees During Performance Reviews

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Performance Appraisals, Performance Reviews on June 19, 2014 at 6:05 am

 

Leadership Eric Jacobson

When you meet with your employee during her annual performance appraisal take time to determine what motivates her when it comes to her career development.  Motivation changes over time and changes depending on where the individual is in her career.

So, to determine what motives her, author Paul Falcone recommends you ask her to rank-order her priorities in terms of the following six guidelines:

  • If you had to chose two categories from the following six, which would you say hold the most significance to you career-wise?

1.  Career progression through the ranks and opportunities for promotion and advancement.

2.  Lateral assumption of increased job responsibilities and skill building (e.g. rotational assignments).

3.  Acquisition of new technical skills (typically requiring outside training and certification).

4.  Development of stronger leadership, managerial, or administrative skills.

5.  Work-life balance.

6.  Money and other forms of compensation.

Then, do your best to match her next year’s goals and objectives with projects, duties, assignments, activities, actions tied to what motivates her most.

You’ll find many more helpful tips in Falcone’s new book, 2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals.

How To Discuss Poor Performance With An Employee

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Performance Appraisals, Performance Reviews on June 3, 2014 at 6:03 am

As a leader, the time will come when you will have to speak with an employee about his or her poor performance. Here are six steps that will guide you through that process:

  1. Tell him what performance is in need of change and be specific.
  2. Tell him how his actions negatively affect the team.
  3. Let the discussion sink in.
  4. Set expectations of performance improvement and time frame, and get his agreement on the desired outcome.
  5. Remind him that he is a valuable part of the team and that you have confidence his performance will improve.
  6. Don’t rehash the discussion later. You made your point. Give him to make his improvement.

How To Avoid 8 Common Performance Evaluation Pitfalls

In General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Management, Performance Appraisals, Setting Goals on December 1, 2010 at 7:33 pm

As the year comes to a close it’s likely time for many business leaders to tackle the annual performance appraisal process.

So, here is a good reminder from author Sharon Armstrong about how to avoid eight performance evaluation pitfalls.  These are in what I consider is the best chapter of the book The Essential HR Handbook, that she co-authored with Barbara Mitchell.
1.  Clustering everyone in the middle performance-rating categories
2.  Overlooking flaws or exaggerating the achievements of favored employees
3.  Excusing substandard performance or behavior because it is widespread
4.  Letting one characteristic – positive or negative – affect your overall assessment
5.  Rating someone based on the company he or she keeps
6.  Rating someone based on a grudge you are holding
7.  Rating someone based on a short time period instead of the entire evaluation period
8.  Rating everyone high, to make you look good

There’s other great information in this 250-page book that is valuable for any manager, and especially good for managers who are new in their leadership position.

When Armstrong isn’t writing books, she’s reading. One of her favorite books is The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave, written by Leigh Branham of the company Keeping The People, Inc., based in Overland Park, KS.

Performance Reviews Are Also For Small Businesses

In General Leadership Skills, Job Descriptions, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Management, Motivating Employees, Performance Appraisals on July 9, 2010 at 8:29 pm

“I think that senior management of businesses should hold managers accountable and take Human Resources out of the role of ‘performance review cops,'” proclaims Sharon Armstrong, author of the new book, The Essential Performance Review Handbook.

“Best practice organizations of all sizes recognize that the success of any performance appraisal system depends heavily on senior-level support,” explained Armstrong.

And when Armstrong refers to businesses of all sizes, she means even those with fewer than 10 employees can benefit by using an appraisal system.

Armstrong’s reasoning is:

For the small business — it’s a chance to:

  • communicate their future plans
  • provide an objective basis for raises and training
  • build stronger working relationships
  • improve overall organizational productivity
  • provide documentation for inquiries on general promotion policies or individual claims of discrimination

For the manager — they get a change to:

  • build their management skills
  • develop and improve rapport with employees
  • identify and reward high performers
  • identify performers needing coaching or training
  • identify general training needs
  • improve group morale

For the employee — they:

  • find out how they’re doing
  • receive recognition for their accomplishments
  • gain two-way communication on goals and performance
  • are encouraged to take responsibility for their performance and progress
  • receive goals that will guide their future efforts
  • are provided opportunities for career development and improvement

Armstrong’s book includes plenty of helpful tips and techniques, along with a host of sample appraisal forms that business can use to create a form and overall process appropriate for their business.

Armstrong is although the author of The Essential HR Handbook, which is ideal for HR managers and non-HR staff, as well.

%d bloggers like this: