Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Motivating Employees’

6 Questions To Ask Your Employees

In Leadership, Employee Engagement, Employee Satisfaction, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Employee Feedback, Eric Jacobson Leadership on June 14, 2016 at 4:09 am

As explained in John Baldoni‘s, book, Lead With Purpose, Marshall Goldsmith suggests all leaders make it a habit to regularly ask their employees these six questions:

  1. Where do you think we should be going?
  2. Where do you think you and your part of the business should be going?
  3. What do you think you’re doing well?
  4. If you were the leader, what ideas would you have for you?
  5. How can I help?
  6. What suggestions or ideas do you have for me?

How To Motivate Employees During Performance Reviews

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Performance Appraisals, Performance Reviews on June 19, 2014 at 6:05 am

 

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When you meet with your employee during her annual performance appraisal take time to determine what motivates her when it comes to her career development.  Motivation changes over time and changes depending on where the individual is in her career.

So, to determine what motives her, author Paul Falcone recommends you ask her to rank-order her priorities in terms of the following six guidelines:

  • If you had to chose two categories from the following six, which would you say hold the most significance to you career-wise?

1.  Career progression through the ranks and opportunities for promotion and advancement.

2.  Lateral assumption of increased job responsibilities and skill building (e.g. rotational assignments).

3.  Acquisition of new technical skills (typically requiring outside training and certification).

4.  Development of stronger leadership, managerial, or administrative skills.

5.  Work-life balance.

6.  Money and other forms of compensation.

Then, do your best to match her next year’s goals and objectives with projects, duties, assignments, activities, actions tied to what motivates her most.

You’ll find many more helpful tips in Falcone’s new book, 2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals.

Three Ways To Drive Motivation

In Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Motivating Employees, Motivation on November 13, 2013 at 8:43 pm

Julian Birkinshaw shares the three drivers of discretionary effort (motivation) from employees in his new book, Becoming a Better Boss:

  1. Material drivers, including salary, bonuses, promotion, and prizes
  2. Social drivers, including recognition for achievement, status, and having good colleagues
  3. Personal drivers, including freedom to act, the opportunity to build expertise, and working for a worthwhile cause

Take a moment now to reflect on where your business excels and where it falls short.

 

 

 

Leadership Tip: Explain Each Person’s Relevance

In Company Culture, Effective Communications, Employee Engagement, Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Management, Motivating Employees on May 20, 2012 at 5:16 am

Your employees appreciate clearly knowing how what they do each day specifically contributes to your company’s or organization’s success.

So, it’s important that you explain the relevance of each person’s job. Help each employee or team member to understand how what they do makes a difference.

Answer their questions about the significance of their work. Demonstrate how if their job isn’t done well, or isn’t fully completed, how that negatively impacts the rest of the process or your business’ overall product or service.

Sometimes in organizations too much time is spent explaining the relevance of sales positions or management positions. But, everyone on the team needs to understand their relevance and the importance of what they do.

Brian Tracy Shows Leaders How To Make Employees Happy In New Book: Full Engagement

In Company Culture, Effective Communications, Employee Engagement, General Leadership Skills, Hiring Great People, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Leading By Example, Listening Skills, Management, Mentoring, Motivating Employees, Team Building on May 25, 2011 at 7:29 pm

Best-selling author Brian Tracy’s newest book, Full Engagement, provides practical advice for how to inspire your employees to perform at their absolute best. He explains that above nearly every measure, employees’ most powerful single motivator is the “desire to be happy”.

So, Tracy teaches you how to make your employees happy by:

  • Organizing their work from the first step in the hiring process through the final step in their departure from your company so they are happy with you, their work, their coworkers, as well as in their interactions with your customers, suppliers and vendors.

Full Engagement includes these chapters and topics:

  • The Psychology of Motivation
  • Ignite the Flame of Personal Performance
  • Make People Feel Important
  • Drive Out Fear
  • Create That Winning Feeling
  • Select The Right People
  • Internal Versus External Motivation

At a minimum, Tracy suggests that managers do the following when managing their employees:

  • Smile
  • Ask questions
  • Listen
  • Be polite
  • Say “Thank You”
  • Keep employees informed
  • Encourage improvement
  • Treat employees like volunteers
  • Pay employees well
  • Compliment employees
  • Assure harmony
  • Praise regularly
  • Refuse to criticize
  • Celebrate success
  • Express interest in employees
  • Be a mentor
  • Give employees freedom to do their work
  • Protect employees from negativity, rudeness or bad treatment from other people
  • Be pleasant
  • Speak positively about your staff with other people
  • Be clear about employee’s job responsibilities
  • Give feedback
  • Be a good role model
  • Disagree without being disagreeable
  • Set clear, specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-bounded goals

One of my favorite sections of the book is where Tracy outlines the Law of Three for hiring:

  • Interview three candidates
  • Interview the person you like best three times
  • Interview the that person in three different meeting places
  • Have three different people interview you top candidate

Tracy provides a number of compelling personal references and examples from his vast business experience and upbringing in Full Engagement. In addition, each chapter in the book ends with a list of Action Exercises to help you implement Tracy’s guidance.

I recommend the book for any manager who wants to learn how best to work with an employee to:

  • build up his/her self-esteem
  • build his/her self-image
  • drive away his/her fears
  • make him/her feel like a winner

Note:  Thanks to the publisher for providing me an advance copy of the book.

Tailor Your Motivation Techniques

In General Leadership Skills, Motivating Employees on November 15, 2009 at 3:19 pm

Photo By: iStock

If you manage a team of more than a couple employees, chances are that each person is motivated by something different.

As their manager, learn what motivates each person on your team and tailor your motivation techniques accordingly.

You’ll find that most people are motivated by much more than money. Some want and need routine praise. Others seek public recognition for a job well done, while some people prefer less public acknowledgement.

Some employees are motivated by being given increasingly more challenging tasks.

You may also find that you’ll have employees on your team who are motivated by being included on your decision making process when you establish policies or procedures. And still others are motivated by being given as much autonomy as reasonably possible.

So, observe, listen, and then tailor your motivation techniques for each of your employees, and be prepared to tweak those techniques if necessary as each person grows within your organization.

Explain Each Person’s Relevance

In General Leadership Skills, Motivating Employees on November 8, 2009 at 9:20 am

Your employees appreciate clearly knowing how what they do each day specifically contributes to your company’s or organization’s success.

So, it’s important that you explain the relevance of each person’s job. Help each employee or team member to understand how what they do makes a difference.

Answer their questions about the significance of their work. Demonstrate how if their job isn’t done well, or isn’t fully completed, how that negatively impacts the rest of the process or your business’ overall product or service.

Sometimes in organizations too much time is spent explaining the relevance of sales positions or management positions. But, everyone on the team needs to understand their relevance and the importance of what they do.

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