Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Listening’

How To Listen And Learn As A Leader

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Listening Skills on July 3, 2016 at 5:05 am

In John Baldoni’s bookThe Leader’s Guide to Speaking with Presence, he provides these tips for listening as a leader and learning as a leader:

When Listening As A Leader:

  • Look at people when they are speaking to you. Make eye contact.
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as “Tell me about…” or “Could you explain this?”
  • Consider the “what if” question:  “What if we looked at the situation like this?”
  • Leverage the “why” question:  “Why do we do it this way?”
  • Employ the “how” question:  “How can you do this?”

When Learning As A Leader:

  • Reflect on what people have told you.
  • Think about what you have not observed.  Are people holding back?  If so, why?
  • Consider how you can implement what you have observed.
  • Get back to people who have suggested ideas to you and thank them.
  • Look for opportunities to collaborate with others.

For nearly 20 years, Baldoni has coached and consulted for a number of leading companies in a variety of different businesses, ranging from automotive and banking to computers, high technology, fast food, and packaged goods.

Listening And Learning As A Leader

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Listening Skills on March 26, 2016 at 1:47 pm

In John Baldoni’s bookThe Leader’s Guide to Speaking with Presence, he provides these tips for listening as a leader and learning as a leader:

When Listening As A Leader:

  • Look at people when they are speaking to you. Make eye contact.
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as “Tell me about…” or “Could you explain this?”
  • Consider the “what if” question:  “What if we looked at the situation like this?”
  • Leverage the “why” question:  “Why do we do it this way?”
  • Employ the “how” question:  “How can you do this?”

When Learning As A Leader:

  • Reflect on what people have told you.
  • Think about what you have not observed.  Are people holding back?  If so, why?
  • Consider how you can implement what you have observed.
  • Get back to people who have suggested ideas to you and thank them.
  • Look for opportunities to collaborate with others.

For nearly 20 years, Baldoni has coached and consulted for a number of leading companies in a variety of different businesses, ranging from automotive and banking to computers, high technology, fast food, and packaged goods.

Listening And Learning As A Leader

In Listening Skills, Uncategorized on January 23, 2016 at 5:43 am

In John Baldoni’s bookThe Leader’s Guide to Speaking with Presence, he provides these tips for listening as a leader and learning as a leader:

When Listening As A Leader:

  • Look at people when they are speaking to you. Make eye contact.
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as “Tell me about…” or “Could you explain this?”
  • Consider the “what if” question:  “What if we looked at the situation like this?”
  • Leverage the “why” question:  “Why do we do it this way?”
  • Employ the “how” question:  “How can you do this?”

When Learning As A Leader:

  • Reflect on what people have told you.
  • Think about what you have not observed.  Are people holding back?  If so, why?
  • Consider how you can implement what you have observed.
  • Get back to people who have suggested ideas to you and thank them.
  • Look for opportunities to collaborate with others.

For about 20 years, Baldoni has coached and consulted for a number of leading companies in a variety of different businesses, ranging from automotive and banking to computers, high technology, fast food, and packaged goods.

How To Convey Effective Listening

In Listening Skills on September 13, 2015 at 4:46 pm

Today’s leadership tip on how to be an active listener comes from the new book, Stronger. The authors explain that perhaps the best single technique to convey effective listening requires you to be an active listener.

When someone has finished making a point, use that person’s name and then paraphrase in your words the essence of what you understood that person to say. Then ask a follow-question. Frame your question to keep the focus on the person speaking.

Listen To Others Before You Speak

In Listening Skills on July 16, 2015 at 6:01 pm

Soon, I’ll be posting an article highlighting the terrific, new book, Stronger: Develop the Resilience You Need to Succeed, but in the meantime, here’s a great passage from the book:

Listen to Others, Especially Before You Speak

When we think of people who possess extraordinary interpersonal skill, we find they are good listeners. In even the briefest of encounters, they can make you feel important.

According to author Denise Restauri, charismatic people are good listeners who make the conversation about the other person. they show genuine interest. They let the world revolve around the other person. They remember the other person’s name– and they use it.

So, when you listen to people, truly listen. Look at the other person with interest. Do not multitask.

The book comes out on August 5.

Listening And Learning As A Leader

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Listening Skills on February 22, 2015 at 12:45 pm

In John Baldoni’s bookThe Leader’s Guide to Speaking with Presence, he provides these tips for listening as a leader and learning as a leader:

 When Listening As A Leader:
  • Look at people when they are speaking to you. Make eye contact.
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as “Tell me about…” or “Could you explain this?”
  • Consider the “what if” question:  “What if we looked at the situation like this?”
  • Leverage the “why” question:  “Why do we do it this way?”
  • Employ the “how” question:  “How can you do this?”

When Learning As A Leader:

  • Reflect on what people have told you.
  • Think about what you have not observed.  Are people holding back?  If so, why?
  • Consider how you can implement what you have observed.
  • Get back to people who have suggested ideas to you and thank them.
  • Look for opportunities to collaborate with others.

For nearly 20 years, Baldoni has coached and consulted for a number of leading companies in a variety of different businesses, ranging from automotive and banking to computers, high technology, fast food, and packaged goods.

How To Listen Effectively

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Listening Skills on January 3, 2015 at 2:48 am

A good book to add to your 2015 reading list is AMACOM’s (a division of the American Management Association), The 11 Laws of Likability.

From the book, here are some great reminders on listening — what to do and what not to do to be a leader who’s an effective listener:

Do:

  • Maintain eye contact
  • Limit your talking
  • Focus on the speaker
  • Ask questions
  • Manage your emotions
  • Listen with your eyes and ears
  • Listen for ideas and opportunities
  • Remain open to the conversation
  • Confirm understanding, paraphrase
  • Give nonverbal messages that you are listening (nod, smile)
  • Ignore distractions

Don’t:

  • Interrupt
  • Show signs of impatience
  • Judge or argue mentally
  • Multitask during a conversation
  • Project your ideas
  • Think about what to say next
  • Have expectations or preconceived ideas
  • Become defensive or assume you are being attacked
  • Use condescending, aggressive, or closed body language
  • Listen with biases or closed to new ideas
  • Jump to conclusions or finish someone’s sentences

Listen To Both Sides Of The Situation

In Effective Communications, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on July 26, 2014 at 12:19 pm

 

If you’re a parent of two children you already know that when the two are fighting and child #1 tells you what happened, you then ask child #2 what happened, and most often the truth is somewhere in the middle of what the two children have told you.

Surprisingly, many managers, even when they are parents, don’t use this parenting “discovery” skill in the workplace. Instead, they often listen to only one side of a situation. Whether it is because of lack of interest or lack of time, they don’t proactively seek out the other side of the story.

The unfortunate result is those managers form incorrect perceptions that can often lead to poor decisions and/or directives.

So, the next time two employees are at odds, or when one department complains about another department within your organization, take the time to listen to all sides of the situation to discover the truth that’s in the middle.

Give Your Undivided Attention To Your Employee

In Eric Jacobson Leadership on June 21, 2014 at 9:09 am

Picture this. You call an employee into your office for a meeting. As your employee is explaining something to you, you turn to your computer monitor to check e-mail. Or, you answer your phone. Or, you look at your mobile device. Or, you engage in a conversation with someone who enters your doorway.

Do any of these once and your employee will likely forgive you. Do any of these actions regularly and you’ll quickly lose the respect of your employee!

Rarely is there a reason not to give your employee your full, undivided attention during a meeting/conversation. You can only be a good listener if you are maintaining eye contact with your employee and not multi-tasking.

Leadership Quotes From The Book, Just Listen

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Quotes, Listening Skills on February 22, 2014 at 9:48 am

Here are some terrific quotes from Mark Goulston’s book, Just Listen:

  • Good management is the art of making problems so interesting and their solutions so constructive that everyone wants to get to work and deal with them. — Paul Hawken
  • Life is mostly a matter of perception and more often misperception. — Dave Logan
  • Everyone has an invisible sign hanging from their next saying, “Make me feel important.” — Mary Kay Ash
  • Do the unexpected. The expected is boring.  The expected is tuned out. — Steve Strauss
  • Humility is the surest sign of strength. — Thomas Merton
  • Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning. — Bill Gates
  • The secret of getting ahead is getting started. — Agatha Chrisie
  • Don’t find fault.  Find a remedy. — Henry Ford
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