Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Leadership’

Seven Elements Of Good Storytelling

In Leadership, Storytelling on April 8, 2018 at 7:05 am

Explaining strategy

According to Kristi Hedges, author of the book, The Power of Presence, a good story includes these seven elements:

  1. Has a clear moral or purpose.
  2. Has a personal connection to the storyteller and/or the audience.
  3. Includes common reference points the audience can understand.
  4. Involves detailed characters and imagery.
  5. Reveals conflict, vulnerability, or achievement others can relate to.
  6. Has pacing (a beginning, ending, and a segue back to the topic).
  7. Serves to strategically underscore your intention (it’s not randomly told).

 

How To Be A Humble Leader

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Jim Collins, Leadership, Leadership Books on April 8, 2018 at 6:48 am

 

Chat symbol and Quotation Mark

From John Blakey’s book, The Trusted Executive, here are four tips from Jim Collins for how to be a humble leader:

  • Demonstrate a compelling modesty, shunning public adulation and never be boastful.
  • Act with quiet, calm determination and motivate others through inspired standards, not inspiring charisma.
  • Channel ambition into the company, not the self, and set up successors for even more greatness in the next generation.
  • Look in the mirror, not out of the window, when apportioning responsibility for poor performance.

How To Be A Good Coach

In Coaching, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership on January 20, 2018 at 4:58 pm

Group Of Coworkers Working In Conference Room

Former Verizon Wireless CEO, Denny F. Strigl offers these tips for how to be a good coach to an employee. He explains that good coaches help performers by:

• Keeping them focused.
• Giving them objective, helpful feedback.
• Acting as a sounding board for new approaches.
• Identifying blind spots that may be holding the performer back.
• Reinforcing key values, principles, and behaviors that improve performance.
• Recognizing positive behavior and performance.
• Providing encouragement after setbacks and failures
• Setting “stretch” goals.
• Acting as an accountability partner.
• Strigl believes that some managers fail in their coaching roles because they:
• View coaching as babysitting.
• See coaching as only correcting performance.
• Don’t spend enough time with their employees.
• Are reluctant to criticize.
• Have social relationships with their employees.
• Have a “sink-or-swim” philosophy.
• Believe coaching is not helpful or meaningful.

“Coaching may actually save time by preventing extensive retraining or intervention to get a failing employee back on track or keep the person from falling off course in the first place,” explains Strigl in his new book, Managers, Can You Hear Me Now?
Every conversation you have with an employee has the potential to be a coaching conversation!

 

 

Leadership Questions To Ask Everyday

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership on December 22, 2017 at 4:35 pm

I’m a big fan of the magazine, Experience Life.  Particularly the monthly Perspective column by Bahram Akradi, the founder and CEO of Life Time Fitness.

Akradi tackled self-reflection awhile back. He firmly believes the business model that if you aren’t innovating you are dying. And, to innovate, you have to regularly fine-tune both your business and your life.

What better way to do that than to ask yourself each day these four questions, says Akradi:

  1. Where did I do some good or make some progress today?
  2. Where did I let myself or others down?
  3. What can I do to keep my good habits going?
  4. What can I do to address any negative triggers or trends before they get out of hand?

Thanks Bahram for this great advice.

6 Questions To Ask Yourself Each Day

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership on November 26, 2017 at 10:57 am

One of my favorite parts of Joe Sweeney‘s book, Moving the Needle, is the section where he recommends you ask yourself these six questions before you go to bed each night:

  1. What was the best thing that happened today?
  2. What am I most grateful for today?
  3. What did I do to live my ideal day today?
  4. What is one new thing I learned today?
  5. What did I do to meet my goals today?
  6. What am I most looking forward to tomorrow?

And, by jotting down your answers to these thoughtful and positive in nature questions sets you in the right frame of mind for waking up in the morning!

Today’s Leadership Quotes

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Quotes on November 21, 2017 at 10:54 am

Some of my favorite quotes for leaders are:

  • A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit — Arnold H. Glasgow
  • I praise loudly, I blame softly — Catherine II of Russia
  • Honest disagreement is often a good sign of progress — Mohandas Gandhi
  • A long dispute means that both parties are wrong — Voltaire
  • The least questioned assumptions are often the most questionable — Paul Broca

These and many more compelling quotes can be found in Susan H. Shearouse’s book, Conflict 101.

Goal For 2018: Find A Mentor

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Leadership, Mentoring on November 18, 2017 at 10:54 am

Having a mentor is one of the best things you can do to advance your career as a leader. So, decide today to secure a mentor who will work with you during 2018. Make that one of your New Year’s resolutions.

A mentor can benefit leaders new to their leadership role and they can benefit experienced and seasoned leaders, as well.

A strong mentoring relationship allows the mentor and the mentee to develop new skills and talents, to build confidence, and to build self-awareness.

Proper mentoring takes a commitment from both parties and it takes time to develop and to reap the rewards of the relationship. Plan to work with your mentor for no less than three months, and ideally for six months or longer.

When seeking out a mentor, think about these questions:

1.  Will the relationship have good personal chemistry?

2.  Can this person guide me, particularly in the areas where I am weakest?

3.  Will this person take a genuine interest in me?

4.  Does this person have the traits and skills I want to develop?

5.  Is this a person I admire?

6.  Does this person have the time needed to properly mentor me? And, do I also have the time to devote to a mentoring relationship?

Most often, you’ll find your best mentors are not your supervisors, but instead are other individuals in your workplace, at other companies in your city, or are members of organizations to which you belong.

Before you start to search for your mentor for 2018, take some time to learn more about mentoring — how mentoring programs work most effectively and what to expect from a mentoring relationship.

One nice benefit of having mentoring as a New Year’s resolution is you’ll have a dedicated partner helping you to fulfill your resolution!

How To Be A High-Performing Team

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Team Building, Teams on October 22, 2017 at 5:54 am

According to Ron Ricci and Carl Wiese, authors of the book, The Collaboration Imperative, high-performing teams have the following characteristics:

  1. People have solid and deep trust in each other and in the team’s purpose–they feel free to express feelings and ideas.
  2. Everybody is working toward the same goals.
  3. Team members are clear on how to work together and how to accomplish tasks.
  4. Everyone understands both team and individual performance goals and knows what is expected.
  5. Team members actively diffuse tension and friction in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.
  6. The team engages in extensive discussion, and everyone gets a chance to contribute–even the introverts.
  7. Disagreement is viewed as a good thing and conflicts are managed.  Criticism is constructive and is oriented toward problem solving and removing obstacles.
  8. The team makes decisions when there is natural agreement–in the cases where agreement is elusive, a decision is made by the team lead or executive sponsor, after which little second-guessing occurs.
  9. Each team member carries his or her own weight and respects the team processes and other members.
  10. The leadership of the team shifts from time to time, as appropriate, to drive results.  No individual members are more important than the team.

Six Questions To Ask Your Employees Today

In Constructive Feedback, Effective Communications, Employee Engagement, Employee Feedback, Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership on September 23, 2017 at 8:41 am

question mark people

As explained in John Baldoni’s, book, Lead With Purpose, Marshall Goldsmith suggests all leaders make it a habit to regularly ask their employees these six questions:

  1. Where do you think we should be going?
  2. Where do you think you and your part of the business should be going?
  3. What do you think you’re doing well?
  4. If you were the leader, what ideas would you have for you?
  5. How can I help?
  6. What suggestions or ideas do you have for me?

The Golden Rules Of Effective Communication

In Communication, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Management on September 20, 2017 at 9:11 am

Here are the 12 golden rules of effective communication from Paul Falcone, as highlighted in his book, 2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals.

Always remember to:

  1. Recognize achievements and accomplishments often.
  2. Celebrate success.
  3. Deliver bad news quickly, constructively, and in a spirit of professional development.
  4. Praise in public, censure in private.
  5. Assume responsibility for problems when things go wrong, and provide immediate praise and recognition to others when things go right.
  6. Create a work environment based on inclusiveness, welcoming others’ suggestions and points of view.
  7. Listen actively, making sure that your people feel heard and understood and have a voice in terms of offering positive suggestions in the office or on the shop floor.
  8. Share information openly (to the extent possible) so that staff members understand the Why behind your reasoning and can ask appropriate questions as they continue along in their own path of career development and learning.
  9. Remember that thankfulness and appreciation are the two most important values you can share with our employees and teach them to live by: make them the core foundation of your culture.
  10. Put others’ needs ahead of your own and expect them to respond in kind (a.k.a. “selfless leadership,” otherwise known as “servant leadership”).
  11. When dealing with others’ shortcomings, always err on the side of compassion.
  12. Solicit ongoing feedback and suggestions form your team in terms of how you could do things differently, thereby stimulating creativity and innovation.
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