Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Leadership Books’

The Art Of Change Leadership

In Change Management, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership on January 12, 2017 at 7:44 pm

The Art of Change Leadership demystifies the psychology behind our reactions to change and offers a powerful collection of tools to inspire individual and collective transformation quickly and more effectively, explains author of the book, Cheryl Cran.

The book teaches you how to:

  • Leverage your current technical knowledge to increase the rate of innovation.
  • Use the cycle of change to foresee and handle change-related issues affecting yourself, others, and business.
  • Raise your emotional intelligence to match your IQ.
  • Guide “change” initiatives with repeatable success by using the reliable three-step change model.

Cran also explains the differences between a Change Manager and a Change Leader.

For example:

  • A Change Manager creates a plan, directs projects and people to achieve a goal. In contrast, a Change Leader sets the compelling vision; tells a story that includes the hero’s journey for each person involved.

In addition, a Change Leader does the following:

  • Provides a project timeline while creating celebration milestones.
  • Connects personally with individuals to “onboard” them to the changes and provides the framework for how the changes will happen.
  • Courageously leads the changes without falter while being open and honest about his or her own fears and challenges along the change journey.
  • Constantly looks to provide added value to the team members by customizing feedback, providing resources and support.
  • Welcomes disruptions and leverages them into new creative solution opportunities for self and for the team.
  • Willingly shares power with others with a depth of confidence and without having the need to protect ego or CYA.
  • Sees the role of a change leader as a facilitator of intelligence and not as the keeper of all knowledge and power.

Cran is the CEO of Evolutionary Business Solutions, Inc.

This Is What A Catalyst Leader Does

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books on November 9, 2016 at 7:25 pm

Catalyst leaders represent the gold standard — energetic, supportive, forward-thinking mentors who spark action in others,” explain Tacy M. Byham and Richard S. Wellins, authors of the new book, Your First Leadership Job — How Catalyst Leaders Bring Out the Best in Others.

More specifically, the authors share that a catalyst leader:

  • Asks and listens
  • Fosters innovation
  • Provides balanced feedback
  • Builds trust
  • Focuses on people’s potential
  • Collaborates and networks
  • Empowers others
  • Encourages development
  • Energizes and mobilizes
  • Aligns actions with strategy

In the book, you’ll learn how catalyst leaders bring out the best in people. They do that by, among other actions, by:

  • Encouraging the person to try new things.
  • Giving the person input on things that affect him/her.
  • Allowing the person to safely learn through failure, so they can take appropriate risks.
  • Taking the time to find out what motivates the person.

The authors also cover the following topics in the book:

  • How to build trust and ownership
  • How to be authentic
  • How to delegate
  • How to nurture business relationships
  • How to become an adviser

Your First Leadership Job is certainly a good book for a first-time leader, but it’s also equally relevant for any leader who wants to become that gold standard catalyst leader.

The Definition Of Meaningful Work

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books on September 16, 2016 at 6:31 pm

There are so many good things to learn in the book, Helping People Win At Work, by Ken Blanchard and Garry Ridge. Among those is the section about how to define meaningful work.

Their definition consists of these seven attributes.  Work is meaningful when it:

  1. It is conducted in a manner that is “good and proper” in all respects.
  2. It positively affects our company and our communities, giving our work an impact that extends beyond ourselves.
  3. It provides learning and growth, offers challenges, requires creativity, pushes us to surpass limits, and creates exciting results.
  4. It provides recognition and rewards for our achievements.
  5. It allows us to succeed as a team while excelling as individuals.
  6. It allows us to enjoy the ride, bringing humor and fun into our work.
  7. It fuels passion!

Listening And Learning As A Leader

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Leadership Books, Leading, Listening Skills on August 28, 2016 at 9:09 am

In John Baldoni’s bookThe Leader’s Guide to Speaking with Presence, he provides these tips for listening as a leader and learning as a leader:

When Listening As A Leader:

  • Look at people when they are speaking to you. Make eye contact.
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as “Tell me about…” or “Could you explain this?”
  • Consider the “what if” question:  “What if we looked at the situation like this?”
  • Leverage the “why” question:  “Why do we do it this way?”
  • Employ the “how” question:  “How can you do this?”

When Learning As A Leader:

  • Reflect on what people have told you.
  • Think about what you have not observed.  Are people holding back?  If so, why?
  • Consider how you can implement what you have observed.
  • Get back to people who have suggested ideas to you and thank them.
  • Look for opportunities to collaborate with others.

For nearly 20 years, Baldoni has coached and consulted for a number of leading companies in a variety of different businesses, ranging from automotive and banking to computers, high technology, fast food, and packaged goods.

Good To Great Is Still Great

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Jim Collins, Leadership, Leadership Books on August 20, 2016 at 10:53 am

If you haven’t read, Good To Greatby Jim Collins, do so.

Near the top of virtually every list you’ll see of the best leadership books, you’ll find Good To Great.

The book, five years in the making, and published in 2001, addresses the all-important question of: Can a good company become a great company, and if so, how?

Some of the lessons from the book are:

  • “Leadership is equally about creating a climate where the truth is heard and the brutal facts confronted.”
  • “Leading from good to great does not mean coming up with the answers and then motivating everyone to follow your messianic vision. It means having the humility to grasp the fact that you do not yet understand enough to have the answers and then to ask the questions that will lead to the best possible insights.”
  • “Good-to-great companies use technology as an accelerator of momentum, not a creator of it.”
  • “Engage in dialogue and debate.”
  • Good-to-great companies are those who have the ability to get and keep enough of the right people.

Good To Great‘s lessons are for entrepreneurs running small businesses, for CEOs of large businesses, and for leaders and managers within businesses at all management levels.

The five years of research that Collins and a team conducted to prep for the book consisted of examining 1,435 U.S., publicly traded companies and their performance over 40 years. The book focuses on 11 good-to-great companies.

How To Lead With Purpose

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, John Baldoni, Leading With Purpose on August 5, 2016 at 11:12 am

“Purpose is the why behind everything within an organization,” says author John Baldoni, of the book, Lead With Purpose.

Baldoni also believes that it is up to leaders to make certain that organizational purpose is understood and acted upon. And, to harness the talents of their employees, leaders must recognize their responsibility to instill purpose in the workplace.

Other recommendations include:

  • Make purpose a central focus
  • Instill purpose in others
  • Make employees comfortable with ambiguity
  • Turn good intentions into great results
  • Make it safe to fail (as well as prevail)
  • Develop the next generation

According to Baldoni, purpose forms the backbone of what an organization exists to do; upon which you can build vision and mission.

To define an organization’s purpose, you must ask three questions:

1. What is our vision — that is, what do we want to become?

2. What is our mission — that is, what do we do now?

3. What are our values–that is, what are the behaviors we expect of ourselves?

Some of my other favorite observations from the book are these two:

  • We follow leaders not because they bring us down, but because they lift our spirits with their attitude, words, and examples.
  • No job is complete without a review. Look at what went right as well as what went wrong. Understand that failure is not grounds for dismissal.

Lead With Purpose draws on extensive research, field work and interviews with dozens of organizational leaders. It also includes the results of an exclusive 2010 leadership survey conducted for the American Management Association (AMA) by NFI Research.

Baldoni is a recognized leadership educator, coach and speaker, and the author of Lead by Example and Lead Your Boss.

Questions To Ask When You Are A Superboss

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books on July 19, 2016 at 6:40 am

Here are ten questions (or bundles of questions) you should ask yourself to ensure you are thinking and acting like a superboss. These are from Sydney Finkelstein‘s new book, Superbosses.

  1. Do you have a specific vision for your work that energizes you, and that you use to energize and inspire your team?
  2. How often do people leave your team to accept a bigger offer elsewhere? What’s that like when it happens?
  3. Do you push your reports to meet only the formal goals set for the team, or are there other goals that employees sometimes also strive to achieve?
  4. How do you go about questioning your own assumptions about the business? How do you get your team to do the same about their own assumptions?
  5. How do you balance the need to delegate responsibilities to team members with the need to provide hands-on coaching to them? How much time do you usually spend coaching employees?
  6. When promoting employees, do you ever put them into challenging jobs where they potentially might fail? If so, how do you manage the potential risk? And what happens if they do fail?
  7. How much affection or connection do members of your team feel with one another? Do people tend to spend time out of the office socializing? What is the balance of competition and collaboration on the team?
  8. Do you continue to stay in touch with employees who have left to work elsewhere?
  9. Have any former employees of yours gone on to have particularly noteworthy careers, either within your organization or elsewhere? If so, how many?
  10. What is the culture like in your team with respect to how much energy you devote to nurturing or developing individuals versus getting the job done?

How To Maximize Employee Engagement

In Employee Engagement, Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Uncategorized on June 5, 2016 at 11:17 am

Overland Park, Kansas-based author Leigh Branham, along with Mark Hirschfeld, awhile back completed a survey of 10,000 employees in 43 states to better understand what separates a “best places to work” company from other companies.

What Branham and Hirschfeld discovered is that the best companies use six “universal drivers” that maximize employee engagement:

  1. Caring, Competent, and Engaging Senior Leaders
  2. Effective Managers Who Keep Employees Aligned and Engaged
  3. Effective Teamwork at All Levels
  4. Job Enrichment and Professional Growth
  5. Valuing Employee Contributions
  6. Concern for Employee Well-Being

Branham also explains that to get the best from your employees you need to re-engage them. You can learn more about how to do that in his book, Re-Engage.

The Five Elements For Goal Setting

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Goal Setting, Setting Goals on June 3, 2016 at 11:15 am

“The more specific you can be about your goal, the greater your level of success will be,” explain authors Tom Pandola and James W. Bird, in their book, Light A Fire Under Your Business.

“This is because once we have visualized something that doesn’t yet exist, it causes our subconscious mind to make the decisions necessary to make that visualized goal a reality.”

The authors explain that all goals must have these five elements:

  1. Goals must clarify a specific action or outcome.
  2. Goals must be measureable by being able to quantify the benefits of achieving them.
  3. Goals should be achievable with the resources available (or at least you should know that the necessary resources are in reserve and can be acquired).
  4. Goals must also be realistic for achieving based on your particular situation.
  5. Goals must also include the time period in which you want to achieve them. With a date or time period specified for completion, planning can be established in order for evaluating the progress toward goal achievement, something that can be measured and quantified.

Leading With Purpose

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leading With Purpose on May 29, 2016 at 8:50 am

“Purpose is the why behind everything within an organization,” says author John Baldoni, of the book, Lead With Purpose.

Baldoni also believes that it is up to leaders to make certain that organizational purpose is understood and acted upon. And, to harness the talents of their employees, leaders must recognize their responsibility to instill purpose in the workplace.

Other recommendations include:

  • Make purpose a central focus
  • Instill purpose in others
  • Make employees comfortable with ambiguity
  • Turn good intentions into great results
  • Make it safe to fail (as well as prevail)
  • Develop the next generation

According to Baldoni, purpose forms the backbone of what an organization exists to do; upon which you can build vision and mission.

To define an organization’s purpose, you must ask three questions:

1. What is our vision — that is, what do we want to become?

2. What is our mission — that is, what do we do now?

3. What are our values–that is, what are the behaviors we expect of ourselves?

Some of my other favorite observations from the book are these two:

  • We follow leaders not because they bring us down, but because they lift our spirits with their attitude, words, and examples.
  • No job is complete without a review. Look at what went right as well as what went wrong. Understand that failure is not grounds for dismissal.

Lead With Purpose draws on extensive research, field work and interviews with dozens of organizational leaders. It also includes the results of an exclusive 2010 leadership survey conducted for the American Management Association (AMA) by NFI Research.

Baldoni is a recognized leadership educator, coach and speaker, and the author of Lead by Example and Lead Your Boss.

%d bloggers like this: