Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘How To Listen’

How To Convey Effective Listening

In Listening Skills on September 13, 2015 at 4:46 pm

Today’s leadership tip on how to be an active listener comes from the new book, Stronger. The authors explain that perhaps the best single technique to convey effective listening requires you to be an active listener.

When someone has finished making a point, use that person’s name and then paraphrase in your words the essence of what you understood that person to say. Then ask a follow-question. Frame your question to keep the focus on the person speaking.

Listen To Others Before You Speak

In Listening Skills on July 16, 2015 at 6:01 pm

Soon, I’ll be posting an article highlighting the terrific, new book, Stronger: Develop the Resilience You Need to Succeed, but in the meantime, here’s a great passage from the book:

Listen to Others, Especially Before You Speak

When we think of people who possess extraordinary interpersonal skill, we find they are good listeners. In even the briefest of encounters, they can make you feel important.

According to author Denise Restauri, charismatic people are good listeners who make the conversation about the other person. they show genuine interest. They let the world revolve around the other person. They remember the other person’s name– and they use it.

So, when you listen to people, truly listen. Look at the other person with interest. Do not multitask.

The book comes out on August 5.

How To Be A Better Listener

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Listening Skills on January 31, 2015 at 6:26 am

Being a good listener is absolutely essential to being an effective leader.

When you really listen, you:

  • Remember names and facts correctly.
  • Hear “between the lines.”
  • Show respect.
  • Learn more about what’s going on within your workplace.

Here are 10 tips on how to be a better listener:

  1. Look at the person who’s speaking to you. Maintain eye contact.
  2. Watch for non-verbal clues, body language, gestures and facial expressions.
  3. Eliminate all distractions. Don’t multi-task.
  4. Ask questions that let the other person know you have heard them, and that you want to learn more.
  5. Don’t interrupt.
  6. Don’t finish the other person’s sentences.
  7. Avoid using words, such as “no,” “but,” and “however,” when you respond.
  8. Don’t prejudge.
  9. Display a friendly, open attitude and body language.
  10. Ask questions to clarify what you heard.

How To Listen And Learn As A Leader

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Listening Skills on September 19, 2014 at 6:12 pm

In John Baldoni’s new bookThe Leader’s Guide to Speaking with Presence, he provides these tips for listening as a leader and learning as a leader:

When Listening As A Leader:

  • Look at people when they are speaking to you. Make eye contact.
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as “Tell me about…” or “Could you explain this?”
  • Consider the “what if” question:  “What if we looked at the situation like this?”
  • Leverage the “why” question:  “Why do we do it this way?”
  • Employ the “how” question:  “How can you do this?”

When Learning As A Leader:

  • Reflect on what people have told you.
  • Think about what you have not observed.  Are people holding back?  If so, why?
  • Consider how you can implement what you have observed.
  • Get back to people who have suggested ideas to you and thank them.
  • Look for opportunities to collaborate with others.

For nearly 20 years, Baldoni has coached and consulted for a number of leading companies in a variety of different businesses, ranging from automotive and banking to computers, high technology, fast food, and packaged goods.

How To Listen And Learn

In Communication, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Listening Skills on December 3, 2013 at 7:01 am

In John Baldoni’s new bookThe Leader’s Guide to Speaking with Presence, he provides these tips for listening as a leader and learning as a leader:

When Listening As A Leader:

  • Look at people when they are speaking to you. Make eye contact.
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as “Tell me about…” or “Could you explain this?”
  • Consider the “what if” question:  “What if we looked at the situation like this?”
  • Leverage the “why” question:  “Why do we do it this way?”
  • Employ the “how” question:  “How can you do this?”

When Learning As A Leader:

  • Reflect on what people have told you.
  • Think about what you have not observed.  Are people holding back?  If so, why?
  • Consider how you can implement what you have observed.
  • Get back to people who have suggested ideas to you and thank them.
  • Look for opportunities to collaborate with others.

For nearly 20 years, Baldoni has coached and consulted for a number of leading companies in a variety of different businesses, ranging from automotive and banking to computers, high technology, fast food, and packaged goods.

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