Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Eric Jacobson Overland Park KS’

The Six Universal Drivers That Maximize Employee Engagement

In Best Places To Work, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on October 28, 2014 at 11:08 am

Overland Park, Kansas-based author Leigh Branham, along with Mark Hirschfeld, awhile back completed a survey of 10,000 employees in 43 states to better understand what separates a “best places to work” company from other companies.

What Branham and Hirschfeld discovered is that the best companies use six “universal drivers” that maximize employee engagement:

  1. Caring, Competent, and Engaging Senior Leaders
  2. Effective Managers Who Keep Employees Aligned and Engaged
  3. Effective Teamwork at All Levels
  4. Job Enrichment and Professional Growth
  5. Valuing Employee Contributions
  6. Concern for Employee Well-Being

Branham also explains that to get the best from your employees you need to re-engage them. You can learn more about how to do that in his book, Re-Engage.

Eric Jacobson Employee Engagement

Delight Your Customers

In Customer Engagement, Customer Retention, Customer Service on April 4, 2014 at 8:02 pm

If you want to delight your customers, then the book by Steve Curtin, Delight Your Customers — 7 Simple Ways to Raise Your Customer Service from Ordinary to Extraordinary, is a must-read for you and your employees.

Published this summer, the book explains the seven ways for you and your employees to demonstrate exceptional customer service:

  1. Express genuine interest
  2. Offer sincere and specific compliments
  3. Share unique knowledge
  4. Convey authentic enthusiasm
  5. Use appropriate humor
  6. Provide pleasant surprises
  7. Deliver service heroics

“Exceptional customer service typically costs no more to deliver than poor customer service,” explains Curtin.

For example:

  • How much does it cost to express genuine interest in customers or to anticipate their needs?
  • Does it cost more to display a sense of urgency or to pay attention to detail?
  • Do you pay your employees more to smile, to make eye contact, or to add energy to their voices?

Curtin reminds readers that:

  • Customers don’t establish relationships with businesses.  They establish relationships with the people inside the businesses.

And, here are some of Curtin’s recommended best ways to express genuine interest in your customers:

  • Offer personalized greetings
  • Use names
  • Practice assertive hospitality
  • Ask questions
  • Anticipate needs
  • Remember preferences
  • Pay attention to detail
  • Display a sense of urgency
  • Solicit feedback
  • Offer personal farewells
  • Follow up on service

And, finally, when soliciting feedback, do so without marginalizing your customers’ suggestions or sounding defensive.

What I’ve Learned About Effective Corporate Cultures

In Company Culture, Corporate Culture, Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Management, Motivating Employees on September 18, 2012 at 5:02 pm

Fortunately, most of my career I’ve worked in effective corporate cultures. If I put together the best of each, here is what made those environments effective:

•  Leaders led by example on a consistent basis and were willing to roll up their sleeves, particularly during tight deadlines or challenging times.

•  Employees clearly understood how what they did made a difference and how their contributions made the organization either more profitable or more effective.

•  The workforce included a blend of long-term employees with a rich company, product/service and customer history, employees who had been at the company for five to seven years, and then new hires with a fresh perspective and keen sense of new technologies and techniques. That blend worked best when the mix included virtually all A-players.

•  Top managers had a clear, realistic and strategic vision for how the company would grow and compete in the marketplace.

•  Employees were challenged and rewarded through growth opportunities, education and training and pay increases.

•  Leaders provided opportunities for the company and its employees to give back to the community. Sometimes it was through company organized volunteer projects. Other times it was by encouraging (and rewarding) employees to volunteer on their own.

•  A group of employees served on an activities committee with as little top management influence as possible, to plan at least monthly team-building, networking, education and charitable activities. This grass-roots approach helped ensure that the culture was shaped and influenced by employees and not only by top management. In this way, employees owned the culture as much as the management did.

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