Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Engaging Employees’

How To Get To Know Your Direct Reports

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, General Leadership Skills on May 6, 2016 at 11:35 am

To help you bring out the best in your team, you need to get close and understand their skills, abilities, and motivations. So, the authors of the book, Your First Leadership Job, recommend you hold getting-to-know-you conversations with each of your direct reports.

Ask these open-ended questions. Let each team member know the purpose of the meeting in advance. And, don’t cheat by adding in work-specific questions.

  1. What do you enjoy doing most as part of your work? Why?
  2. What do you  miss most about the jobs you’ve had in the past? Why?
  3. What things about your current job do you enjoy the least? Why?
  4. How do you cope with or relieve stress?
  5. To help you do your job, what could I change about: Your work environment? The content of your work? How you get your work done?
  6. What form of recognition do you prefer or not prefer?

How To Engage Your Employees

In Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books on March 18, 2016 at 7:38 am

Here are 10 tips for how to maximize employee involvement:

  1. Have active ways to listen to your employees.
  2. Check often with employees to see if the information you are sharing with them is what they need and what they want.
  3. Share information about customer satisfaction with employees.
  4. Discuss financial performance with your employees and be sure everyone understands the importance of profitability and how they can contribute to profitability.
  5. Allow ad hoc teams among employees to form to address organizational problems and work with those teams to tackle the identified issues.
  6. Encourage employees to make suggestions for improvement whether those ideas are large or small.
  7. Take an idea from one employee and share it with other employees and teams and let everyone make a contribution to build upon that idea.
  8. Train!
  9. For long-term employees, find ways to keep their jobs interesting through new assignments and challenges.
  10. Conduct meetings around specific issues and brainstorm solutions.

“Involving people in the business is the most effective way to produce an organization in which people know more, care more, and do the right things,” said Edward Lawler III, Professor, University of Southern California, as quoted in the book, 1001 Ways To Energize Employees, by author Bob Nelson.

Teach An Employee Something New Today

In Leadership on August 14, 2015 at 5:11 pm

Take the opportunity today to teach an employee something new. Nearly everyone likes to learn and is capable of tackling a new challenge.

  • Teach your employee something that expands his (or her) current job description.
  • Teach something that will help him to get promoted within your organization at a later date.
  • Teach him a skill that uses new technology.
  • Or, teach him something that will allow him to be a more skilled leader and manager in the future.

You can even teach something that you no longer need to be doing in your position, but that will be a rewarding challenge/task for your employee.

The benefit to your employee is obvious. The benefit to you is you’ll have a more skilled team member who is capable of handling more work that can help you to grow your business and/or make it run more efficiently.

Be a leader who teaches.

Ask Your Employees These Six Questions Often

In Employee Engagement, Employee Feedback, Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on August 20, 2014 at 7:57 pm

As explained in John Baldoni’s, book, Lead With Purpose, Marshall Goldsmith suggests all leaders make it a habit to regularly ask their employees these six questions:

  1. Where do you think we should be going?
  2. Where do you think you and your part of the business should be going?
  3. What do you think you’re doing well?
  4. If you were the leader, what ideas would you have for you?
  5. How can I help?
  6. What suggestions or ideas do you have for me?

10 Ways To Maximize Employee Involvement

In Employee Engagement, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Management, Motivating Employees on May 4, 2013 at 7:09 am

Eric Jacobson Leadership

Here are 10 tips for how to maximize employee involvement:

  1. Have active ways to listen to your employees.
  2. Check often with employees to see if the information you are sharing with them is what they need and what they want.
  3. Share information about customer satisfaction with employees.
  4. Discuss financial performance with your employees and be sure everyone understands the importance of profitability and how they can contribute to profitability.
  5. Allow ad hoc teams among employees to form to address organizational problems and work with those teams to tackle the identified issues.
  6. Encourage employees to make suggestions for improvement whether those ideas are large or small.
  7. Take an idea from one employee and share it with other employees and teams and let everyone make a contribution to build upon that idea.
  8. Train!
  9. For long-term employees, find ways to keep their jobs interesting through new assignments and challenges.
  10. Conduct meetings around specific issues and brainstorm solutions.

“Involving people in the business is the most effective way to produce an organization in which people know more, care more, and do the right things,” said Edward Lawler III, Professor, University of Southern California, as quoted in the book, 1001 Ways To Energize Employees, by author Bob Nelson.

Top 3 Ways To Engage Employees During Tough Economic Times

In Company Culture, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Skills, Listening Skills, Management, Motivating Employees on April 26, 2010 at 5:52 pm

Senior leaders at the best performing companies during these tough economic times are doing three three things to maximize engagement with their employees:

  1. Developing a clear and credible plan for, and path to, success.
  2. Making sure the plan is clearly communicated from top to bottom.
  3. Seeking and welcoming every idea for making the plan a reality and delivering more value (e.g. big and small improvements, new ideas and suggestions for innovation).

This is according to Leigh Branham, Overland Park, KS co-author of the recently released book, Re-Engage: How America’s Best Places To Work Inspire Extra Effort In Extraordinary Times.  It’s these three actions that surfaced to the top during the research that Branham, co-author Mark Hirschfeld and Quantum Workplace did among 10,000 employers during the past few years.

“What we saw in the companies that were losing ground was that employees:

  • were in a high state of fear
  • had uncertainty
  • had doubt about their own jobs

…and had doubt about the survival of their companies,” said Branham.

“What’s missing in those companies is not just a sense of mission and purpose, but employees who are clear about the plan to recover and get back on the path to success,” he added.

Branham said that, “It seemed clear to us that the leaders of the least engaging workplaces were not filling the vacuum by communicating the plan for overcoming the obstacles they face.”

The book points out that when the communication need is not met by the management team, and when employees don’t get the information they need, they will create their own information, which is often worse than the reality.

Branham also stressed the importance of welcoming ideas from employees.  He cited Best Buy that through its employee social networking site called Blue-Shirt Nation, has received more than 900 cost-cutting and revenue-producing ideas from its employees.  He added that leveraging Web 2.0 with company Blogs and wikis to make it easier for employees to communicate their ideas is something all companies should consider.

Finally, Re-Engage suggests leaders also do the following to strengthen employee engagement:

  1. Set a clear, compelling direction that empowers each employee
  2. Deliver only open and honest communication
  3. Continue career growth and development for employees
  4. Recognize and reward high performance
%d bloggers like this: