Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Employee Retention’

The Exit Interview

In Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Exit Interviews, Human Resources on January 30, 2016 at 6:55 am

Knowing why an employee leaves your company can help you to reduce your employee turnover rate.

That’s because you can use the reasons a departing employee provides to gather information about processes, people and departments that might need some redirection to correct situations that may have contributed to the employee’s reasons for leaving.

So, do an exit interview whenever possible with each departing employee. Ask each person:

  • Why they are leaving
  • What they liked about their job
  • What they would have changed about their job
  • How they felt about the cooperation level among co-workers
  • How they felt about communication and interaction with co-workers
  • Whether they received the necessary training to do their job
  • Whether they received frequent coaching and balanced feedback from their supervisor
  • Would they recommend a friend apply for work at your company
  • How they felt about their pay
  • How they would describe the morale in the company and in their department
  • What they would change about their department and the company
  • Whether they received the necessary information to perform their job effectively

You can find other great advice about exit interviews in the book, The Essential HR Handbook, written by Sharon Armstrong and Barbara Mitchell. The book is a quick and handy resource for any leader, manager or Human Resource professional.

What Best Companies Do To Attract And Retain Employees

In Best Places To Work, Leadership on August 30, 2015 at 8:39 am

Here are some of the things the companies often ranked as “best companies” by leading industry magazines do to attract and retain employees. Many of these programs and activities take little to no investment. But, they all can only happen when there’s strong leadership at the company’s helm.

Try some of these in your workplace this year:

  • Mentoring programs, especially for new employees
  • Volunteer opportunities/days
  • Lunches with the CEO or president
  • On-site wellness fairs
  • Pep rallies
  • Telecommuting programs
  • Summer picnics for employees and their families
  • Retention bonuses
  • Lending libraries
  • Unlimited sick days
  • Employee team sports after hours, such as bowling and baseball
  • On-site child care services
  • Awarding vacation time in exchange for community volunteering time
  • Employee pot-luck breakfasts
  • Monthly birthday parties
  • On-site fitness equipment
  • Frequent town hall meetings with upper management
  • Subsidized gym memberships
  • Leadership development programs
  • Time given to employees to spend on work related items outside their job description
  • Employee blogging programs
  • Suggestion boxes
  • Milk and cookie socials
  • Computer classes to prepare employees for higher-paying positions
  • Sabbatical programs

How To Retain Your Employees

In Employee Retention on June 29, 2015 at 5:47 pm

I had the pleasure of interviewing Leigh Branham over the past few years. He’s the author of the popular book called, The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave.

He told me that in research that he has done about the leaders of companies that have won “Best-Place-To-Work” competitions in 45 U.S. cities, that there are six things these effective leaders do that don’t cost money. They do, however, cost time and effort. But, that is time and effort that can pay big dividends.

Here are the six things you can do:

  1. Make the commitment to create a great place to work.

  2. Inspire employee confidence in decisions and clear business direction

  3. Work to build trust based on honesty and integrity

  4. Practice open, two-way communication, especially in times of uncertainty

  5. Look out for the organization before you look out for yourself

  6. Believe employees should be developed and retained; not burned out and discarded

Thanks for these great leadership tips, Leigh!

How To Reduce Employee Turnover

In Employee Retention, Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on February 26, 2015 at 7:35 pm

Knowing why an employee leaves your company can help you to reduce your employee turnover rate.

That’s because you can use the reasons a departing employee provides to gather information about processes, people and departments that might need some redirection to correct situations that may have contributed to the employee’s reasons for leaving.

So, do an exit interview whenever possible with each departing employee. Ask each person:

  • Why they are leaving
  • What they liked about their job
  • What they would have changed about their job
  • How they felt about the cooperation level among co-workers
  • How they felt about communication and interaction with co-workers
  • Whether they received the necessary training to do their job
  • Whether they received frequent coaching and balanced feedback from their supervisor
  • Would they recommend a friend apply for work at your company
  • How they felt about their pay
  • How they would describe the morale in the company and in their department
  • What they would change about their department and the company
  • Whether they received the necessary information to perform their job effectively

You can find other great advice about exit interviews in the book, The Essential HR Handbook, written by Sharon Armstrong and Barbara Mitchell. The book is a quick and handy resource for any leader, manager or Human Resource professional.

How To Reduce Your Turnover Rate

In Employee Retention, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on March 24, 2014 at 4:01 pm

Knowing why an employee leaves your company can help you to reduce your employee turnover rate.

That’s because you can use the reasons a departing employee provides to gather information about processes, people and departments that might need some redirection to correct situations that may have contributed to the employee’s reasons for leaving.

So, do an exit interview whenever possible with each departing employee.  Ask each person:

  • Why they are leaving
  • What they liked about their job
  • What they would have changed about their job
  • How they felt about the cooperation level among co-workers
  • How they felt about communication and interaction with co-workers
  • Whether they received the necessary training to do their job
  • Whether they received frequent coaching and balanced feedback from their supervisor
  • Would they recommend a friend apply for work at your company
  • How they felt about their pay
  • How they would describe the morale in the company and in their department
  • What they would change about their department and the company
  • Whether they received the necessary information to perform their job effectively

You can find other great advice about exit interviews in the book, The Essential HR Handbook, written by Sharon Armstrong and Barbara Mitchell.  The book is a quick and handy resource for any leader, manager or Human Resource professional.

Are Your Supervisors Driving Away Your Employees?

In Company Culture, Effective Communications, Employee Engagement, Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Engaging Employees, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Management, Motivating Employees on February 15, 2012 at 8:08 pm

One section in Richard Finnegan’s book called, Rethinking Retention in Good Times and Bad, compares traditional thinking versus new ways to think about retention and the vital role supervisors play in retaining employees.  For example:

Traditional Thinking:  Human Resources-driven programs like pay and recognition are essential for retention.

Rethinking Retention:  Ineffective supervisors trump programs and drive turnover.

Traditional Thinking:  All aspects of company culture contribute equally to retention.

Rethinking Retention:  Supervisor-employee relationships have a disproportionate impact on retention; the supervisor is the company.

Traditional Thinking:  Centralized communication and career programs impact all employees equally.

Rethinking Retention:  Supervisors drive what employees know and learn and help them prepare for careers.

Are your supervisors helping to retain employees or driving them away?

Are You Doing All You Can To Retain Your Employees?

In Company Culture, Employee Engagement, Employee Satisfaction, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Management on January 4, 2011 at 8:38 pm

A survey recently completed by the job-placement firm Manpower that found 84 percent of employees intend to look around for a new job this year, and that is up from 60 percent last year.  The high number of those wanting to change jobs is primarily because they’re disappointed with their current jobs where for the past year they’ve have increased workloads and no to small pay increases.

Business leaders can read Overland Park, KS’s Leigh Branham’s books:

  • The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave
  • Re-Engage

to learn more about why employees leave their workplaces (including non-financial reasons), and what leaders can do to boost employee retention.  Both are excellent books.

Good Supervisors Key To Employee Retention

In Company Culture, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Management, Motivating Employees on August 23, 2010 at 6:00 pm

Richard Finnegan has written a terrific new book called, Rethinking Retention in Good Times and Bad.

One section compares traditional thinking versus new ways to think about retention and the vital role supervisors play in retaining employees.  For example:

Traditional Thinking:  Human Resources-driven programs like pay and recognition are essential for retention.
Rethinking Retention:  Ineffective supervisors trump programs and drive turnover.

Traditional Thinking:  All aspects of company culture contribute equally to retention.
Rethinking Retention:  Supervisor-employee relationships have a disproportionate impact on retention; the supervisor is the company.

Traditional Thinking:  Centralized communication and career programs impact all employees equally.
Rethinking Retention:  Supervisors drive what employees know and learn and help them prepare for careers.

Are your supervisors helping to retain employees or driving them away?

Block The Exit Door

In Company Culture, General Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Leading By Example, Motivating Employees on December 16, 2009 at 9:12 am

Fifty-five percent of employees plan to change jobs, careers or industries “when the economy recovers,” according to the 2009 Employment Dynamics and Growth Expectations Report.

One in five workers are “highly disengaged,” reports the Corporate Leadership Council.

So, even though the writing may be on the wall come the economic recovery, there are steps a workplace leader can take to help retain employees.

According to Leigh Branham, founder and CEO of Keeping The People Inc. in Overland Park, KS, and as he discussed in “The Thinking Bigger Guide For KC Entrepreneurs” magazine, there are seven primary reasons employees leave:

  1. The job or workplace was not as expected
  2. Mismatch between job and person
  3. Too little coaching and feedback
  4. Too few growth and advancement opportunities
  5. Feeling devalued and unrecognized
  6. Stress from overwork and work-life imbalance
  7. Loss of trust and confidence in senior leaders

Fortunately, even now when budgets are tight, workloads are hefty, and companies have depressed top and bottom lines, leaders can at a minimum address reasons #3, #5 and and #7 without spending money. 

Branham’s firm helps organizations analyze the root causes of employee disengagement and turnover, and then helps them develop and implement employer-of-choice strategies.

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