Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Employee Engagement’

Six Questions To Ask Your Employees Today

In Constructive Feedback, Effective Communications, Employee Engagement, Employee Feedback, Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership on September 23, 2017 at 8:41 am

question mark people

As explained in John Baldoni’s, book, Lead With Purpose, Marshall Goldsmith suggests all leaders make it a habit to regularly ask their employees these six questions:

  1. Where do you think we should be going?
  2. Where do you think you and your part of the business should be going?
  3. What do you think you’re doing well?
  4. If you were the leader, what ideas would you have for you?
  5. How can I help?
  6. What suggestions or ideas do you have for me?

The Six Questions Leaders Should Ask Employees

In Employee Engagement, Employee Feedback, Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Leadership on August 20, 2017 at 9:35 am

As explained in John Baldoni‘s, book, Lead With PurposeMarshall Goldsmith suggests all leaders make it a habit to regularly ask their employees these six questions:

  1. Where do you think we should be going?
  2. Where do you think you and your part of the business should be going?
  3. What do you think you’re doing well?
  4. If you were the leader, what ideas would you have for you?
  5. How can I help?
  6. What suggestions or ideas do you have for me?

How To Create A Positive Work Experience

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Uncategorized on September 3, 2016 at 11:25 am

In the book, The Optimistic Workplace, author Shawn Murphy, explains that the following beliefs are essential to helping create a positive work experience:

  1. The team is more important than any individual. For optimism to be strong, a cohesive team is vital. People need to believe the team will be there for them when needed. A team is weakened when the first priority is the needs of each person, or when ego dictates a team’s actions or inaction. And, avoid relying on the usual suspects, the same few superstars, to handle high-profile projects.
  2. There’s value to experiencing joy at work. Joy can open brains to better see connections and various options to solve work problems. Joy is about playing. Play at work is useful when creativity and innovation are needed. The usefulness of creativity and innovation at the workplace is linked to increasing employees’ knowledge and skills.
  3. Doing good is good for business. It’s not just about philanthropy. Do good by not contributing to the stress levels of  your employees who struggle to find a healthy mix between their personal and work lives.
  4. Relationships between leaders and employees need to be richer. Relationships are central to cooperation, collaboration, and successful outcomes.
  5. Work should align with purpose and meaning. Purpose and meaning are too often downplayed while businesses emphasize financial motivation. A focus on financial motivators blinds leaders from helping employees do work that matters.
  6. Leaders need to actualize human potential. Actualizing human potential is built on the fundamental belief that people are inherently good, will do good, and can be trusted.

Shawn Murphy

Murphy is an independent consultant with 20 years’ experience working with a variety of organizations.

How To Maximize Employee Engagement

In Employee Engagement, Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Uncategorized on June 5, 2016 at 11:17 am

Overland Park, Kansas-based author Leigh Branham, along with Mark Hirschfeld, awhile back completed a survey of 10,000 employees in 43 states to better understand what separates a “best places to work” company from other companies.

What Branham and Hirschfeld discovered is that the best companies use six “universal drivers” that maximize employee engagement:

  1. Caring, Competent, and Engaging Senior Leaders
  2. Effective Managers Who Keep Employees Aligned and Engaged
  3. Effective Teamwork at All Levels
  4. Job Enrichment and Professional Growth
  5. Valuing Employee Contributions
  6. Concern for Employee Well-Being

Branham also explains that to get the best from your employees you need to re-engage them. You can learn more about how to do that in his book, Re-Engage.

How To Engage Your Employees

In Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books on March 18, 2016 at 7:38 am

Here are 10 tips for how to maximize employee involvement:

  1. Have active ways to listen to your employees.
  2. Check often with employees to see if the information you are sharing with them is what they need and what they want.
  3. Share information about customer satisfaction with employees.
  4. Discuss financial performance with your employees and be sure everyone understands the importance of profitability and how they can contribute to profitability.
  5. Allow ad hoc teams among employees to form to address organizational problems and work with those teams to tackle the identified issues.
  6. Encourage employees to make suggestions for improvement whether those ideas are large or small.
  7. Take an idea from one employee and share it with other employees and teams and let everyone make a contribution to build upon that idea.
  8. Train!
  9. For long-term employees, find ways to keep their jobs interesting through new assignments and challenges.
  10. Conduct meetings around specific issues and brainstorm solutions.

“Involving people in the business is the most effective way to produce an organization in which people know more, care more, and do the right things,” said Edward Lawler III, Professor, University of Southern California, as quoted in the book, 1001 Ways To Energize Employees, by author Bob Nelson.

How To Maximize Employee Involvement

In Employee Engagement, Leadership on October 16, 2015 at 4:46 am

Here are 10 tips for how to maximize employee involvement:

  1. Have active ways to listen to your employees.
  2. Check often with employees to see if the information you are sharing with them is what they need and what they want.
  3. Share information about customer satisfaction with employees.
  4. Discuss financial performance with your employees and be sure everyone understands the importance of profitability and how they can contribute to profitability.
  5. Allow ad hoc teams among employees to form to address organizational problems and work with those teams to tackle the identified issues.
  6. Encourage employees to make suggestions for improvement whether those ideas are large or small.
  7. Take an idea from one employee and share it with other employees and teams and let everyone make a contribution to build upon that idea.
  8. Train!
  9. For long-term employees, find ways to keep their jobs interesting through new assignments and challenges.
  10. Conduct meetings around specific issues and brainstorm solutions.

“Involving people in the business is the most effective way to produce an organization in which people know more, care more, and do the right things,” explains Edward Lawler III, Professor, University of Southern California, as quoted in the book, 1001 Ways To Energize Employees, by author Bob Nelson.

Teach An Employee Something New Today

In Leadership on August 14, 2015 at 5:11 pm

Take the opportunity today to teach an employee something new. Nearly everyone likes to learn and is capable of tackling a new challenge.

  • Teach your employee something that expands his (or her) current job description.
  • Teach something that will help him to get promoted within your organization at a later date.
  • Teach him a skill that uses new technology.
  • Or, teach him something that will allow him to be a more skilled leader and manager in the future.

You can even teach something that you no longer need to be doing in your position, but that will be a rewarding challenge/task for your employee.

The benefit to your employee is obvious. The benefit to you is you’ll have a more skilled team member who is capable of handling more work that can help you to grow your business and/or make it run more efficiently.

Be a leader who teaches.

How To Keep Employees Engaged

In Employee Engagement, Employee Satisfaction, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on March 10, 2014 at 9:48 am

Overland Park, Kansas-based author Leigh Branham, along with Mark Hirschfeld, awhile back completed a survey of 10,000 employees in 43 states to better understand what separates a “best places to work” company from other companies.

What Branham and Hirschfeld discovered is that the best companies use six “universal drivers” that maximize employee engagement:

  1. Caring, Competent, and Engaging Senior Leaders
  2. Effective Managers Who Keep Employees Aligned and Engaged
  3. Effective Teamwork at All Levels
  4. Job Enrichment and Professional Growth
  5. Valuing Employee Contributions
  6. Concern for Employee Well-Being

Branham also explains that to get the best from your employees you need to re-engage them. You can learn more about how to do that in his book, Re-Engage.

The Enemy of Engagement — Frustration In The Workplace

In Company Culture, Employee Engagement, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Management, Motivating Employees on October 7, 2011 at 6:01 pm

Frustration in the workplace is a silent killer,” claim authors Mark Royal and Tom Agnew in their terrific new book, The Enemy of Engagement, coming out this month from Amacom.

Further, “in an organizational context, frustration is not as simple as failing to get something you want.  Rather, it involves the inability to succeed in your role due to organizational barriers or the inability to bring the bulk of your individual talents, skills, and abilities to your job.”

Royal and Agnew further explain that a staggering number of highly motivated, engaged, and loyal employees quit trying–or quit, period–because they feel frustrated.

And what’s causing all that frustration?  It’s lack of enablement.

According to Royal and Agnew, as employees grow in experience in their roles, they begin to focus less on learning the ropes and more on achieving desired results.  In the process, they are increasingly confronted with enablement constraints that limit their ability to get their jobs done effectively.

  • And, the employees who are frustrated are not the demotivated and disengaged employees who simply don’t care enough about organizational success to become deeply frustrated.

In the book, you’ll learn how to enable employees, including these techniques:

  • Put them in optimized roles that leverage their skills and abilities
  • Give them the tools, technology, information, and a supportive environment
  • Get out of their way
  • Don’t introduce procedural barriers
  • Don’t dilute their focus
  • Don’t consume their energy with tasks that don’t add value

Much of the book discusses how engagement and why it’s imperative employees can be engaged so they feel they are contributing in a positive way to something larger them themselves.   And Royal and Agnew build the case for why both enablement AND engagement are critical.

That’s because, according to the authors’ research:

  • Companies that both engage and enable employees demonstrate total reduction in voluntary turnover by 54 percent.
  • Engaged employees are 10 percent more likely to exceed performance expectations, but highly engaged and enabled employees are 50 percent more likely to outperform expectations.

Finally, you’ll find a solid list of to-do’s for positioning motivated employees to succeed and for enhancing employee enablement as the authors provide expert guidance related to:

  • Performance management
  • Authority and empowerment
  • Resources
  • Training
  • Collaboration
  • Work, structure and process

If you are leading an organization where your employees are not engaged and not enabled, The Enemy of Engagement is a must-read book for you.  Don’t let your employees be part of these findings by various Hay Group surveys (cited by the authors) where they found that:

  • 30 percent of employees indicate that they do not have enough authority to carry out their jobs effectively.
  • Nearly one-third of employees do not feel that their managers encourage them to come up with new and better ways of doing things.
  • One-third of employees report that they do not have the resources and information they need to do their jobs well.
  • Nearly half of employees do not feel that their teams receive high-quality support from other teams within their organizations.
  • Nearly 45 percent of employees report that their organizations are insufficiently innovative in using new technologies or creative approaches to improve internal effectiveness.

Note:  Thank you to Amacom for sending me an advance copy of this book.

10 Tips For Engaging Your Employees

In Company Culture, Employee Engagement, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Listening Skills, Management, Motivating Employees on July 26, 2011 at 9:01 pm

Here are 10 tips for how to maximize employee involvement:

  1. Have active ways to listen to your employees.
  2. Check often with employees to see if the information you are sharing with them is what they need and what they want.
  3. Share information about customer satisfaction with employees.
  4. Discuss financial performance with your employees and be sure everyone understands the importance of profitability and how they can contribute to profitability.
  5. Allow ad hoc teams among employees to form to address organizational problems and work with those teams to tackle the identified issues.
  6. Encourage employees to make suggestions for improvement whether those ideas are large or small.
  7. Take an idea from one employee and share it with other employees and teams and let everyone make a contribution to build upon that idea.
  8. Train!
  9. For long-term employees, find ways to keep their jobs interesting through new assignments and challenges.
  10. Conduct meetings around specific issues and brainstorm solutions.

“Involving people in the business is the most effective way to produce an organization in which people know more, care more, and do the right things,” said Edward Lawler III, Professor, University of Southern
California, as quoted in the book, 1001 Ways To Energize Employees, by author Bob Nelson.

%d bloggers like this: