Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Effective Listening’

How To Listen And Learn As A Leader

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Listening Skills on July 3, 2016 at 5:05 am

In John Baldoni’s bookThe Leader’s Guide to Speaking with Presence, he provides these tips for listening as a leader and learning as a leader:

When Listening As A Leader:

  • Look at people when they are speaking to you. Make eye contact.
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as “Tell me about…” or “Could you explain this?”
  • Consider the “what if” question:  “What if we looked at the situation like this?”
  • Leverage the “why” question:  “Why do we do it this way?”
  • Employ the “how” question:  “How can you do this?”

When Learning As A Leader:

  • Reflect on what people have told you.
  • Think about what you have not observed.  Are people holding back?  If so, why?
  • Consider how you can implement what you have observed.
  • Get back to people who have suggested ideas to you and thank them.
  • Look for opportunities to collaborate with others.

For nearly 20 years, Baldoni has coached and consulted for a number of leading companies in a variety of different businesses, ranging from automotive and banking to computers, high technology, fast food, and packaged goods.

Listening And Learning As A Leader

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Listening Skills on March 26, 2016 at 1:47 pm

In John Baldoni’s bookThe Leader’s Guide to Speaking with Presence, he provides these tips for listening as a leader and learning as a leader:

When Listening As A Leader:

  • Look at people when they are speaking to you. Make eye contact.
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as “Tell me about…” or “Could you explain this?”
  • Consider the “what if” question:  “What if we looked at the situation like this?”
  • Leverage the “why” question:  “Why do we do it this way?”
  • Employ the “how” question:  “How can you do this?”

When Learning As A Leader:

  • Reflect on what people have told you.
  • Think about what you have not observed.  Are people holding back?  If so, why?
  • Consider how you can implement what you have observed.
  • Get back to people who have suggested ideas to you and thank them.
  • Look for opportunities to collaborate with others.

For nearly 20 years, Baldoni has coached and consulted for a number of leading companies in a variety of different businesses, ranging from automotive and banking to computers, high technology, fast food, and packaged goods.

Listening And Learning As A Leader

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Listening Skills on February 22, 2015 at 12:45 pm

In John Baldoni’s bookThe Leader’s Guide to Speaking with Presence, he provides these tips for listening as a leader and learning as a leader:

 When Listening As A Leader:
  • Look at people when they are speaking to you. Make eye contact.
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as “Tell me about…” or “Could you explain this?”
  • Consider the “what if” question:  “What if we looked at the situation like this?”
  • Leverage the “why” question:  “Why do we do it this way?”
  • Employ the “how” question:  “How can you do this?”

When Learning As A Leader:

  • Reflect on what people have told you.
  • Think about what you have not observed.  Are people holding back?  If so, why?
  • Consider how you can implement what you have observed.
  • Get back to people who have suggested ideas to you and thank them.
  • Look for opportunities to collaborate with others.

For nearly 20 years, Baldoni has coached and consulted for a number of leading companies in a variety of different businesses, ranging from automotive and banking to computers, high technology, fast food, and packaged goods.

How To Listen Effectively

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Listening Skills on January 3, 2015 at 2:48 am

A good book to add to your 2015 reading list is AMACOM’s (a division of the American Management Association), The 11 Laws of Likability.

From the book, here are some great reminders on listening — what to do and what not to do to be a leader who’s an effective listener:

Do:

  • Maintain eye contact
  • Limit your talking
  • Focus on the speaker
  • Ask questions
  • Manage your emotions
  • Listen with your eyes and ears
  • Listen for ideas and opportunities
  • Remain open to the conversation
  • Confirm understanding, paraphrase
  • Give nonverbal messages that you are listening (nod, smile)
  • Ignore distractions

Don’t:

  • Interrupt
  • Show signs of impatience
  • Judge or argue mentally
  • Multitask during a conversation
  • Project your ideas
  • Think about what to say next
  • Have expectations or preconceived ideas
  • Become defensive or assume you are being attacked
  • Use condescending, aggressive, or closed body language
  • Listen with biases or closed to new ideas
  • Jump to conclusions or finish someone’s sentences

Listen To Both Sides Of The Situation

In Effective Communications, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on July 26, 2014 at 12:19 pm

 

If you’re a parent of two children you already know that when the two are fighting and child #1 tells you what happened, you then ask child #2 what happened, and most often the truth is somewhere in the middle of what the two children have told you.

Surprisingly, many managers, even when they are parents, don’t use this parenting “discovery” skill in the workplace. Instead, they often listen to only one side of a situation. Whether it is because of lack of interest or lack of time, they don’t proactively seek out the other side of the story.

The unfortunate result is those managers form incorrect perceptions that can often lead to poor decisions and/or directives.

So, the next time two employees are at odds, or when one department complains about another department within your organization, take the time to listen to all sides of the situation to discover the truth that’s in the middle.

Give Your Undivided Attention To Your Employee

In Eric Jacobson Leadership on June 21, 2014 at 9:09 am

Picture this. You call an employee into your office for a meeting. As your employee is explaining something to you, you turn to your computer monitor to check e-mail. Or, you answer your phone. Or, you look at your mobile device. Or, you engage in a conversation with someone who enters your doorway.

Do any of these once and your employee will likely forgive you. Do any of these actions regularly and you’ll quickly lose the respect of your employee!

Rarely is there a reason not to give your employee your full, undivided attention during a meeting/conversation. You can only be a good listener if you are maintaining eye contact with your employee and not multi-tasking.

How To Listen Effectively

In Effective Communications, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Listening Skills, Management on August 29, 2011 at 8:45 pm

In a couple weeks, AMACOM, a division of the American Management Association, will release Michelle Tillis Lederman’s new book, The 11 Laws of Likability.  I’m nearly finished reading the advance copy AMACOM sent me and will post a book review soon.

In the meantime, here are some great reminders from Lederman’s book on listeningwhat to do and what not to do to be a leader who’s an effective listener:

Do:

  • Maintain eye contact
  • Limit your talking
  • Focus on the speaker
  • Ask questions
  • Manage your emotions
  • Listen with your eyes and ears
  • Listen for ideas and opportunities
  • Remain open to the conversation
  • Confirm understanding, paraphrase
  • Give nonverbal messages that you are listening (nod, smile)
  • Ignore distractions

 

Don’t:

  • Interrupt
  • Show signs of impatience
  • Judge or argue mentally
  • Multitask during a conversation
  • Project your ideas
  • Think about what to say next
  • Have expectations or preconceived ideas
  • Become defensive or assume you are being attacked
  • Use condescending, aggressive, or closed body language
  • Listen with biases or closed to new ideas
  • Jump to conclusions or finish someone’s sentences

Tips For Being A Better Listener

In Effective Communications, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Listening Skills, Management on June 30, 2011 at 7:59 pm

Here are some ways to sharpen your listening skills to help you derive the fullest meaning from what is being communicated:

  • Listen for potential
  • Listen for what’s not said
  • Listen for inconsistency
  • Identify nonverbal signals
  • Listen for perspective
  • Listen for energy
  • Listen for themes and threads
  • Listen for what’s behind the words
  • Listen through the silence
  • Listen for positive change
  • Acknowledge you’re listening
  • Know when to interrupt

The last tip, about interrupting, kind of surprised me when I read this list in the book, What Could Happen If You Do Nothing.  But, there are times when interrupting makes sense.  Strategic interrupting can be both clarifying and productive for both parties.  For example, it makes sense to interrupt when:

  • You feel that you or the other person has lost the thread
  • You need clarification to fully get what’s going on
  • There’s an opportunity to offer a suggestion
  • It might be helpful to reframe or offer another way to look at a situation

And, if you are having a conversation with someone who is expressing their feelings or attitudes, keep in mind that according to professor Albert Mehrabian of UCLA that within that communication to you:

  • 7 percent is in the words that are spoken
  • 38 percent is in the way the words are said
  • 55 percent is in facial expression

How To Be A Good Listener

In General Leadership Skills, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Listening Skills on March 7, 2010 at 10:37 am

 

March is Listening Awareness Month according to the International Listening Association (ILA). 

Being a good listener is absolutely essential to being an effective leader.

When you really listen, you:

  • Remember names and facts correctly.
  • Hear “between the lines.”
  • Show respect.
  • Learn more about what’s going on within your workplace.

Here’s how to be a better listener:

  1. Look at the person who’s speaking to you. Maintain eye contact.
  2. Watch for non-verbal clues, body language, gestures and facial expressions.
  3. Eliminate all distractions.  Don’t multi-task.
  4. Ask questions that let the other person know you have heard them, and that you want to learn more.
  5. Don’t interrupt.
  6. Don’t finish the other person’s sentences.
  7. Avoid using words, such as “no,” “but,” and “however,” when you respond.
  8. Don’t prejudge.
  9. Display a friendly, open attitude and body language.
  10. Ask questions to clarify what you heard.
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