Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Coaching Employees’

How To Be A Good Coach

In Coaching, Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on July 6, 2016 at 5:07 am

Former Verizon Wireless CEO, Denny F. Strigl offers these tips for how to be a good coach to an employee. He explains that good coaches help performers by:

  • Keeping them focused.
  • Giving them objective, helpful feedback.
  • Acting as a sounding board for new approaches.
  • Identifying blind spots that may be holding the performer back.
  • Reinforcing key values, principles, and behaviors that improve performance.
  • Recognizing positive behavior and performance.
  • Providing encouragement after setbacks and failures
  • Setting “stretch” goals.
  • Acting as an accountability partner.

Strigl believes that some managers fail in their coaching roles because they:

  • View coaching as babysitting.
  • See coaching as only correcting performance.
  • Don’t spend enough time with their employees.
  • Are reluctant to criticize.
  • Have social relationships with their employees.
  • Have a “sink-or-swim” philosophy.
  • Believe coaching is not helpful or meaningful.

“Coaching may actually save time by preventing extensive retraining or intervention to get a failing employee back on track or keep the person from falling off course in the first place,” explains Strigl in his book, Managers, Can You Hear Me Now?

Every conversation you have with an employee has the potential to be a coaching conversation!

How To Be A Good Coach

In Coaching on February 14, 2016 at 10:41 am

Former Verizon Wireless CEO, Denny F. Strigl offers these tips for how to be a good coach to an employee. He explains that good coaches help performers by:

  • Keeping them focused.
  • Giving them objective, helpful feedback.
  • Acting as a sounding board for new approaches.
  • Identifying blind spots that may be holding the performer back.
  • Reinforcing key values, principles, and behaviors that improve performance.
  • Recognizing positive behavior and performance.
  • Providing encouragement after setbacks and failures
  • Setting “stretch” goals.
  • Acting as an accountability partner.

Strigl believes that some managers fail in their coaching roles because they:

  • View coaching as babysitting.
  • See coaching as only correcting performance.
  • Don’t spend enough time with their employees.
  • Are reluctant to criticize.
  • Have social relationships with their employees.
  • Have a “sink-or-swim” philosophy.
  • Believe coaching is not helpful or meaningful.

“Coaching may actually save time by preventing extensive retraining or intervention to get a failing employee back on track or keep the person from falling off course in the first place,” explains Strigl in his new book, Managers, Can You Hear Me Now?

Every conversation you have with an employee has the potential to be a coaching conversation!

The Difference Betweeen Coaching And Counseling Is Important

In Coaching, Counseling, Effective Communications, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Leadership, Management on February 24, 2013 at 6:05 am

A good manager is both a coach and a counselor.  Generally, coaching should precede counseling.

As a coach, a manager:

  • identifies an employee’s need for instruction and direction

and this need is usually directly related to his or her performance or career goals.  Coaching is collaborative. It relies on mutual, progressive goal-setting, personal feedback, and an ongoing, supportive relationship.

You coach to help retain employees and to show you care about your employees as individuals.  It’s best to coach when a new procedure is introduced, a job is changed, and/or a skill gap is identified.

As a counselor, a manager:

  • first identifies a problem that interferes with an employee’s work performance and then helps the employee to define specifically what behavior he or she needs to change in order to improve his or her performance or resolve a problem.

So, the difference between coach and counselor is subtle, but important.  And, as Sharon Armstrong further shares in her book, “The Essential HR Handbook,” a good manager who is both a coach and a counselor:

  • Motivates employees to do good work
  • Reinforces good performance
  • Encourages employees to stretch
  • Sets clear expectations
  • Provides positive feedback on an ongoing basis
  • Provides constructive feedback on a timely basis
  • Acknowledges employees’ progress toward their goals

How To Be A Good Coach To An Employee

In Coaching, Effective Communications, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Listening Skills, Management on August 21, 2011 at 8:17 am

Former Verizon Wireless CEO, Denny F. Strigl offers these tips for how to be a good coach to an employee.  He explains that good coaches help performers by:

  • Keeping them focused.
  • Giving them objective, helpful feedback.
  • Acting as a sounding board for new approaches.
  • Identifying blind spots that may be holding the performer back.
  • Reinforcing key values, principles, and behaviors that improve performance.
  • Recognizing positive behavior and performance.
  • Providing encouragement after setbacks and failures
  • Setting “stretch” goals.
  • Acting as an accountability partner.

Strigl believes that some managers fail in their coaching roles because they:

  • View coaching as babysitting.
  • See coaching as only correcting performance.
  • Don’t spend enough time with their employees.
  • Are reluctant to criticize.
  • Have social relationships with their employees.
  • Have a “sink-or-swim” philosophy.
  • Believe coaching is not helpful or meaningful.

“Coaching may actually save time by preventing extensive retraining or intervention to get a failing employee back on track or keep the person from falling off course in the first place,” explains Strigl in his new book, Managers, Can You Hear Me Now?

Every conversation you have with an employee has the potential to be a coaching conversation!

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