Eric Jacobson

Posts Tagged ‘Coaching A Team’

How To Be A Good Coach

In Coaching, Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on July 6, 2016 at 5:07 am

Former Verizon Wireless CEO, Denny F. Strigl offers these tips for how to be a good coach to an employee. He explains that good coaches help performers by:

  • Keeping them focused.
  • Giving them objective, helpful feedback.
  • Acting as a sounding board for new approaches.
  • Identifying blind spots that may be holding the performer back.
  • Reinforcing key values, principles, and behaviors that improve performance.
  • Recognizing positive behavior and performance.
  • Providing encouragement after setbacks and failures
  • Setting “stretch” goals.
  • Acting as an accountability partner.

Strigl believes that some managers fail in their coaching roles because they:

  • View coaching as babysitting.
  • See coaching as only correcting performance.
  • Don’t spend enough time with their employees.
  • Are reluctant to criticize.
  • Have social relationships with their employees.
  • Have a “sink-or-swim” philosophy.
  • Believe coaching is not helpful or meaningful.

“Coaching may actually save time by preventing extensive retraining or intervention to get a failing employee back on track or keep the person from falling off course in the first place,” explains Strigl in his book, Managers, Can You Hear Me Now?

Every conversation you have with an employee has the potential to be a coaching conversation!

How To Be A Good Coach

In Coaching on February 14, 2016 at 10:41 am

Former Verizon Wireless CEO, Denny F. Strigl offers these tips for how to be a good coach to an employee. He explains that good coaches help performers by:

  • Keeping them focused.
  • Giving them objective, helpful feedback.
  • Acting as a sounding board for new approaches.
  • Identifying blind spots that may be holding the performer back.
  • Reinforcing key values, principles, and behaviors that improve performance.
  • Recognizing positive behavior and performance.
  • Providing encouragement after setbacks and failures
  • Setting “stretch” goals.
  • Acting as an accountability partner.

Strigl believes that some managers fail in their coaching roles because they:

  • View coaching as babysitting.
  • See coaching as only correcting performance.
  • Don’t spend enough time with their employees.
  • Are reluctant to criticize.
  • Have social relationships with their employees.
  • Have a “sink-or-swim” philosophy.
  • Believe coaching is not helpful or meaningful.

“Coaching may actually save time by preventing extensive retraining or intervention to get a failing employee back on track or keep the person from falling off course in the first place,” explains Strigl in his new book, Managers, Can You Hear Me Now?

Every conversation you have with an employee has the potential to be a coaching conversation!

How To Create A High-Performance Team

In Building Teams, Teams on December 21, 2015 at 6:35 pm

Here is some great advice from the authors of the book, Light A Fire Under Your Business, about high-performance teams:

Once you have developed teamwork within a group, synergy is born. But it is the mission that creates motivation, an essential ingredient in high-performance teamwork. High-performance teams must have a common purpose to experience the motivation to achieve shared success.

When team members share a duty to serve a stated mission and respond in like fashion, they create motivation in each other. One of the greatest elements of a well-written mission statement is that every person on your team will use it as the same foundation for decision making. Regardless of his or her specific responsibilities or status on the team or in the organization, everyone is motivated by the same mission but from a different perspective.

How To Be A Good Coach

In Coaching, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on October 4, 2014 at 7:06 pm

 

Former Verizon Wireless CEO, Denny F. Strigl offers these tips for how to be a good coach to an employee.  He explains that good coaches help performers by:

  • Keeping them focused.
  • Giving them objective, helpful feedback.
  • Acting as a sounding board for new approaches.
  • Identifying blind spots that may be holding the performer back.
  • Reinforcing key values, principles, and behaviors that improve performance.
  • Recognizing positive behavior and performance.
  • Providing encouragement after setbacks and failures
  • Setting “stretch” goals.
  • Acting as an accountability partner.

Strigl believes that some managers fail in their coaching roles because they:

  • View coaching as babysitting.
  • See coaching as only correcting performance.
  • Don’t spend enough time with their employees.
  • Are reluctant to criticize.
  • Have social relationships with their employees.
  • Have a “sink-or-swim” philosophy.
  • Believe coaching is not helpful or meaningful.

“Coaching may actually save time by preventing extensive retraining or intervention to get a failing employee back on track or keep the person from falling off course in the first place,” explains Strigl in his new book, Managers, Can You Hear Me Now?

How To Coach A Team

In Coaching, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Trust Building on February 11, 2014 at 7:44 am

Eric Jacobson Kansas City

Here are some great tips (and reminders) for how to be an effective coach of a team, from the author of, Unbundle It, C. Elliott Haverlack:

  • The best coaches embrace variety
  • Individual praise is most often best done in private
  • Correcting behavior should always be done in private
  • The team trumps the individual when it comes to recognition

And, as a leader, you should step back and ask yourself two questions:

  1. Am I leading or am I part of a group of talented individuals who have been thrown together as a team?
  2. Am I leading or am I part of a great team who has members who are talented?

Number 2 is far more powerful and will win more frequently and more reliably.

How To Be A Good Team Coach

In Coaching, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Team Building on November 14, 2013 at 8:11 pm

Here are some great tips (and reminders) for how to be an effective coach of a team, from the author of, Unbundle It, C. Elliott Haverlack:

  • The best coaches embrace variety
  • Individual praise is most often best done in private
  • Correcting behavior should always be done in private
  • The team trumps the individual when it comes to recognition

And, as a leader, you should step back and ask yourself two questions:

  1. Am I leading or am I part of a group of talented individuals who have been thrown together as a team?
  2. Am I leading or am I part of a great team who has members who are talented?

Number 2 is far more powerful and will win more frequently and more reliably.

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