Eric Jacobson

Archive for the ‘Team Building’ Category

How To Maximize Your Team’s Results

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Skills, Leading, Team Building, Teams on May 1, 2016 at 5:18 am

High-functioning and effective teams can disagree and still produce excellent products and results. Team members can also disagree and still care about each other. And, they can challenge each other to think differently.

Best-selling leadership book authors Scott J. Allen and Mitchell Kusy recommend that leaders ask seven tough questions of their teams to help maximize their results.

Here are those questions to ask each team member:

  • What are some obstacles affecting this team?
  • What are opportunities we could take advantage of that we have been largely ignoring?
  • Where can you take greater ownership on this team?
  • Where have you let this team down?
  • Compared to other teams with which you are familiar, how are we doing?
  • When was the last time you complimented the team or one of its members?
  • How open are you to giving direct feedback to team members?

How To Build A High-Performing Team

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Team Building, Teams on April 9, 2016 at 11:57 am

According to Ron Ricci and Carl Wiese, authors of the book, The Collaboration Imperative, high-performing teams have the following characteristics:

  1. People have solid and deep trust in each other and in the team’s purpose–they feel free to express feelings and ideas.
  2. Everybody is working toward the same goals.
  3. Team members are clear on how to work together and how to accomplish tasks.
  4. Everyone understands both team and individual performance goals and knows what is expected.
  5. Team members actively diffuse tension and friction in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.
  6. The team engages in extensive discussion, and everyone gets a chance to contribute–even the introverts.
  7. Disagreement is viewed as a good thing and conflicts are managed.  Criticism is constructive and is oriented toward problem solving and removing obstacles.
  8. The team makes decisions when there is natural agreement–in the cases where agreement is elusive, a decision is made by the team lead or executive sponsor, after which little second-guessing occurs.
  9. Each team member carries his or her own weight and respects the team processes and other members.
  10. The leadership of the team shirts from time to time, as appropriate, to drive results.  No individual members are more important than the team.

How To Build A Powerful Team

In Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Skills, Team Building, Teams on January 5, 2016 at 5:48 am

Take some quality time to read the book by C. Elliott HaverlackUnbunde It, because it explores the issues you face as a leader with a twist that is different from many other leadership books.  Throughout, the book offers suggestions on how to overcome the burden that complexity creates in our lives and businesses.

Most intriguing for me is Haverlack’s straight-forward, unbundled insights on teams.  “The healthiest teams trust each other,” explains the author. “When we trust, we tend to be more transparent and are more likely to share the hurdles we need to leap. And, once trust becomes a competency, accountability comes much more easily.” And, accountability is the key to delivering results.

Haverlack’s eight-point plan for a powerful team is:

  1. Engage a group that shares your core values.
  2. Set aspirational yet achievable goals for the company and every individual.
  3. Create an environment that encourages and rewards trust.
  4. Empower every individual to create and achieve greatness.
  5. Persuade them to stretch.
  6. Love them when they fail.
  7. Create an environment that encourages and reward self-discipline.
  8. Have the courage to exit those from the team who do not fit.

Other particularly useful sections in Unbundle It are the ones on:

  • Tips for excellence in the email world
  • Ground rules for meetings
  • Coaching

Why You Need Veterans And Rookies

In Team Building, Teams, teamwork on April 11, 2015 at 1:48 pm

In her book, Rookie Smarts, author Liz Wiseman explains the benefits of having both veteran employees and new employees (rookies) on a team.  The four main benefits are:

  1. The veteran brings clarity and gravitas while the rookie brings energy and determination.
  2. The veteran sees the potential and promise of the novel ideas of the rookie.
  3. The veteran knows how the world works and guides the entrepreneur who wants to change the world.
  4. When the disparate contributions of experience and naivete are appreciated, the combination sparks collective brilliance.

How To Build A Powerful Team

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Team Building, Teams on January 6, 2015 at 6:59 pm

Take some quality time to read the book by C. Elliott HaverlackUnbunde It, because it explores the issues you face as a leader with a twist that is different from many other leadership books.  Throughout, the book offers suggestions on how to overcome the burden that complexity creates in our lives and businesses.

Most intriguing for me is Haverlack’s straight-forward, unbundled insights on teams.  “The healthiest teams trust each other,” explains the author.  “When we trust, we tend to be more transparent and are more likely to share the hurdles we need to leap.  And, once trust becomes a competency, accountability comes much more easily.”  And, accountability is the key to delivering results.

Haverlack’s eight-point plan for a powerful team is:

  1. Engage a group that shares your core values.
  2. Set aspirational yet achievable goals for the company and every individual.
  3. Create an environment that encourages and rewards trust.
  4. Empower every individual to create and achieve greatness.
  5. Persuade them to stretch.
  6. Love them when they fail.
  7. Create an environment that encourages and reward self-discipline.
  8. Have the courage to exit those from the team who do not fit.

Other particularly useful sections in Unbundle It are the ones on:

  • Tips for excellence in the email world
  • Ground rules for meetings
  • Coaching

 

4 Benefits Of Having Veterans And Rookies On A Team

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Team Building, Teams on November 24, 2014 at 9:50 am

In her new book, Rookie Smarts, author Liz Wiseman explains the benefits of having both veteran employees and new employees (rookies) on a team.   The four main benefits are:

  1. The veteran brings clarity and gravitas while the rookie brings energy and determination.
  2. The veteran sees the potential and promise of the novel ideas of the rookie.
  3. The veteran knows how the world works and guides the entrepreneur who wants to change the world.
  4. When the disparate contributions of experience and naivete are appreciated, the combination sparks collective brilliance.

Tips For Leading A Successful Business Operation

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Team Building, Teams on August 13, 2014 at 5:48 am

Here are some good tips for leading a successful business operation from the handy booklet, 144 Ways To Walk The Talk, by Eric Harvey and Al Lucia:

  1. Involve your team in setting standards that are achievable but also require everyone to stretch their knowledge and skills.
  2. Remember that regardless of what you say, it is the performance you’re willing to accept that becomes your true standard.
  3. Work as a team to stay abreast of technology advancements.  Have different employees read different trade and professional magazines and blogs.   Ask others to share key learning from workshops, webinars, seminars and conferences they attend.  Make it easy via meetings and or within an Intranet forum/Blog area to share what everyone is learning and hearing.
  4. Ask each member of your group to identify the three most significant obstacles to their performance.  Create a master list and develop strategies to eliminate them.  Then, reward employees for identifying obstacles!

The 10 Characteristics Of High-Performing Teams

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Team Building, Teams on August 10, 2014 at 8:42 am

eric jacobson teamwork

According to Ron Ricci and Carl Wiese, authors of the book, The Collaboration Imperative, high-performing teams have the following characteristics:

  1. People have solid and deep trust in each other and in the team’s purpose–they feel free to express feelings and ideas.
  2. Everybody is working toward the same goals.
  3. Team members are clear on how to work together and how to accomplish tasks.
  4. Everyone understands both team and individual performance goals and knows what is expected.
  5. Team members actively diffuse tension and friction in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.
  6. The team engages in extensive discussion, and everyone gets a chance to contribute–even the introverts.
  7. Disagreement is viewed as a good thing and conflicts are managed.  Criticism is constructive and is oriented toward problem solving and removing obstacles.
  8. The team makes decisions when there is natural agreement–in the cases where agreement is elusive, a decision is made by the team lead or executive sponsor, after which little second-guessing occurs.
  9. Each team member carries his or her own weight and respects the team processes and other members.
  10. The leadership of the team shirts from time to time, as appropriate, to drive results.  No individual members are more important than the team.

How To Deliver Excellent Internal Customer Service

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Internal Customer Service, Team Building, Teams on July 17, 2014 at 6:19 am

 

Too often, we think of only external customer service, and forget about the need for excellent internal customer service.

No matter what type of business, organization or team you lead, remind your team members/employees of the need for and importance of internal customer service.

Similar to external customer service, that means employees/team members should:

1. Return phone calls on a timely basis.

2. Answer e-mails.

3. Be polite.

4. Probe to discover how else he/she can be helpful to a co-worker.

5. Be respectful of co-workers.

Lead your team in providing excellent internal customer service. If need be, make internal customer service a discussion topic at your next group meeting.

How Uplifting Leadership Empowers Teams

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Team Building, Teams on July 16, 2014 at 5:54 pm

Here’s great advice and insight about leadership and teams that pull together, from the new book, Uplifting Leadership: How Organizations, Teams, and Communities Raise Performance:

“Uplifting leadership entails engaging a talented team that values risk and creativity, acknowledges and tolerates honest mistakes, and has members that participate and ‘play’ in interchangeable roles and positions. They inspire each other as leadership emerges throughout the group.”

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