Eric Jacobson

Archive for the ‘Performance Reviews’ Category

How To Discuss Poor Performance With An Employee

In Performance Appraisals, Performance Reviews on October 3, 2016 at 6:00 pm

As a leader, the time will come when you will have to speak with an employee about his or her poor performance. Here are six steps that will guide you through that process:

  1. Tell him what performance is in need of change and be specific.
  2. Tell him how his actions negatively affect the team.
  3. Let the discussion sink in.
  4. Set expectations of performance improvement and timeframe, and get his agreement on the desired outcome.
  5. Remind him that he is a valuable part of the team and that you have confidence his performance will improve.
  6. Don’t rehash the discussion later. You made your point. Give him to make his improvement.

How To Discuss Poor Performance With An Employee

In Performance Appraisals, Performance Reviews on February 24, 2016 at 8:24 pm

As a leader, the time will come when you will have to speak with an employee about his or her poor performance. Here are six steps that will guide you through that process:

  1. Tell him what performance is in need of change and be specific.
  2. Tell him how his actions negatively affect the team.
  3. Let the discussion sink in.
  4. Set expectations of performance improvement and time frame, and get his agreement on the desired outcome.
  5. Remind him that he is a valuable part of the team and that you have confidence his performance will improve.
  6. Don’t rehash the discussion later. You made your point. Give him to make his improvement.

Six Guidelines For An Employee To Rank During A Performance Review

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Performance Reviews on November 2, 2014 at 10:04 am

Eric Jacobson

When you meet with your employee during her annual performance appraisal take time to determine what motivates her when it comes to her career development.  Motivation changes over time and changes depending on where the individual is in her career.

So, to determine what motives her, author Paul Falcone recommends you ask her to rank-order her priorities in terms of the following six guidelines:

  • If you had to chose two categories from the following six, which would you say hold the most significance to you career-wise?

1.  Career progression through the ranks and opportunities for promotion and advancement.

2.  Lateral assumption of increased job responsibilities and skill building (e.g. rotational assignments).

3.  Acquisition of new technical skills (typically requiring outside training and certification).

4.  Development of stronger leadership, managerial, or administrative skills.

5.  Work-life balance.

6.  Money and other forms of compensation.

Then, do your best to match her next year’s goals and objectives with projects, duties, assignments, activities, actions tied to what motivates her most.

You’ll find many more helpful tips in Falcone’s new book, 2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals.

How To Motivate Employees During Performance Reviews

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Performance Appraisals, Performance Reviews on June 19, 2014 at 6:05 am

 

Leadership Eric Jacobson

When you meet with your employee during her annual performance appraisal take time to determine what motivates her when it comes to her career development.  Motivation changes over time and changes depending on where the individual is in her career.

So, to determine what motives her, author Paul Falcone recommends you ask her to rank-order her priorities in terms of the following six guidelines:

  • If you had to chose two categories from the following six, which would you say hold the most significance to you career-wise?

1.  Career progression through the ranks and opportunities for promotion and advancement.

2.  Lateral assumption of increased job responsibilities and skill building (e.g. rotational assignments).

3.  Acquisition of new technical skills (typically requiring outside training and certification).

4.  Development of stronger leadership, managerial, or administrative skills.

5.  Work-life balance.

6.  Money and other forms of compensation.

Then, do your best to match her next year’s goals and objectives with projects, duties, assignments, activities, actions tied to what motivates her most.

You’ll find many more helpful tips in Falcone’s new book, 2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals.

How To Discuss Poor Performance With An Employee

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Performance Appraisals, Performance Reviews on June 3, 2014 at 6:03 am

As a leader, the time will come when you will have to speak with an employee about his or her poor performance. Here are six steps that will guide you through that process:

  1. Tell him what performance is in need of change and be specific.
  2. Tell him how his actions negatively affect the team.
  3. Let the discussion sink in.
  4. Set expectations of performance improvement and time frame, and get his agreement on the desired outcome.
  5. Remind him that he is a valuable part of the team and that you have confidence his performance will improve.
  6. Don’t rehash the discussion later. You made your point. Give him to make his improvement.
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