Eric Jacobson

Archive for the ‘Mission Statement’ Category

The Elements Of A Mission Statement

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Management, Mission Statement, Mission Statements on July 30, 2016 at 11:11 am

A lot of companies struggle when creating their mission statement.

Author Peter F. Drucker provides the following good advice in one of my favorite book’s of his, The Five Most Important Questions You Will Ever Ask About Your Organization:”

Every mission statement has to reflect three things:

  • Opportunities
  • Competence
  • Commitment

In other words, he explains:

  • What is our purpose?
  • Why do we do what we do?
  • What, in the end, do we want to be remembered for?

How well does your mission statement meet Drucker’s recommended three requirements?

The Difference Between A Mission And A Vision

In Mission Statement, Vision Statements on June 16, 2013 at 9:14 am

Eric Jacobson Leadership

Here’s a good definition of the difference between a mission and a vision by leadership book authors George Bradt, Jayme A. Check and Jorge Pedraza:

  • Mission – A mission guides what people do every day.  It informs what roles need to exist in the organization.
  • Vision – A vision is the picture of future success.  It helps define areas where the organization needs to be best in class and helps keep everyone aware of the essence of the company.

How Marriott Excels In Good Leadership And Customer Service

In Customer Service, Employee Engagement, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leading By Example, Management, Mission Statement on August 25, 2012 at 12:15 pm

The next time you stay at a Marriott hotel look in the nightstand drawer for Marriott’s booklet that highlights its milestones and tells the Marriott story.

In the booklet, you’ll find the following 12 ways that Marriott practices good leadership AND customer service:

  1. Continually challenge your team to do better.
  2. Take good care of your employees, and they’ll take good care of your customers, and the customers will come back.
  3. Celebrate your people’s success, not your own.
  4. Know what you’re good at and mine those competencies for all you’re worth.
  5. Do it and do it now. Err on the side of taking action.
  6. Communicate. Listen to your customers, associates and competitors.
  7. See and be seen. Get out of your office, walk around, make yourself visible and accessible.
  8. Success is in the details.
  9. It’s more important to hire people with the right qualities than with specific experience.
  10. Customer needs may vary, but their bias for quality never does.
  11. Eliminate the cause of a mistake. Don’t just clean it up.
  12. View every problem as an opportunity to grow.

Kudos to Marriott.

3 Things Every Mission Statement Must Have

In Company Culture, Effective Communications, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Management, Mission Statement, Vision Statements on March 28, 2012 at 7:39 pm

A lot of companies struggle when creating their mission statement.

Author Peter F. Drucker provides the following good advice in one of my favorite book’s of his, The Five Most Important Questions You Will Ever Ask About Your Organization:”

Every mission statement has to reflect three things:

  • Opportunities
  • Competence
  • Commitment

In other words, he explains:

  • What is our purpose?
  • Why do we do what we do?
  • What, in the end, do we want to be remembered for?

How well does your mission statement meet Drucker’s recommended three requirements?

The Difference Between A Mission And A Vision

In General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Management, Mission Statement, Vision Statements on September 10, 2011 at 5:07 pm

Here’s a good definition of the difference between a mission and a vision by leadership book authors George Bradt, Jayme A. Check and Jorge Pedraza:

  • Mission – A mission guides what people do every day.  It informs what roles need to exist in the organization.
  • Vision – A vision is the picture of future success.  It helps define areas where the organization needs to be best in class and helps keep everyone aware of the essence of the company.

Thompson’s And Tracy’s Latest Book Provides Blueprint For Business Success

In Company Culture, General Leadership Skills, Hiring Great People, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Making Decisions, Management, Mission Statement, Motivating Employees, Strategic Planning, Team Building on February 1, 2011 at 4:28 pm

When you start reading Mark Thompson’s and Brian Tracy’s latest book called, Now…Build a Great Business!, you may feel like you are reading 200 pages of Blog posts, but the bite-sized approach to providing tools, practical steps and ideas, rather than theory, is precisely the authors’ intended approach.

The book thoroughly explains the seven keys for how to achieve business success:

  1. Become a great leader
  2. Develop a great business plan
  3. Surround yourself with great people
  4. Offer a great product or service
  5. Design a great marketing plan
  6. Perfect a great sales process
  7. Create a great customer experience

You’ll find a checklist at the end of each step (each chapter) where you can write down your action plan for applying what you’ve learned.

Particularly interesting is the chapter on strategic planning, where the authors recommend you should ask yourself these important questions before you act to create or reinvent the direction of your organization:

  • Where are you now? What is your current situation?
  • How did you get to where you are today?
  • Where do you want to go from here?
  • How do you get from where you are today to where you want to be in the future?
  • What obstacles will you have to overcome?  What problems will you have to solve?
  • What additional knowledge, skills, or resources will you require to achieve your strategic objectives?

When it comes time to surround yourself with great people, Thompson and Tracy remind us that great people are:

  • Good team players.
  • More concerned with what’s right rather than who’s right.
  • Intensely results oriented.

And, great people accept high levels of responsibility for the outcomes required of them, and consider their company a great place to work.

Mark Thompson is an entrepreneur who sold his last company for $100 million and today coaches executives on how to lead growth companies.  Brian Tracy speaks throughout the country about the development of human potential and personal effectiveness. I thank them for sending me a copy of their book.  It’s a worthwhile read.

How To Write A Business Plan In About One Hour

In Company Culture, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Management, Mission Statement, Motivating Employees, Team Building on November 7, 2010 at 11:04 am

Kansas City’s Joe Calhoon, published earlier this month, The 1 Hour Plan for Growth, where he provides a system for creating a clear and compelling business plan for growth.

I believe business plans are critical to any business — new or old.  So, if this book helps those who have been putting off the task because it seems too daunting, try Calhoon’s book.

The 194-page shows business leaders how to write a plan in about one hour so it fits on a single sheet of paper.  The plan will include six essential elements:

  1. Vision
  2. Mission
  3. Values
  4. Objectives
  5. Strategies
  6. Priorities

And, Calhoon teaches how to write a plan that will engage employees and develop leadership capacity.  Calhoon’s system has been used by Kansas City-based companies, such as:

  • Cruise Holidays of KC
  • Jack Stack Barbecue
  • Redemption Plus
  • United Heating & Cooling

“Joe Calhoon is an expert at making the growth planning process simple. This book is a must read for every team member where leadership is committed to growth.  Now there is a book which makes the growth planning process simple and practical,” said Stephen Linnemann, VP at Burns & McDonnell Engineering.

Must-Read Book For Nonprofit Leaders

In Company Culture, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Skills, Making Decisions, Management, Mission Statement, Motivating Employees on October 2, 2010 at 9:13 am

If you lead a nonprofit organization, the one hour it will take you to read Peter F. Drucker’s book called “The Five Most Important Questions You Will Ever Ask About Your Organization” will be well worth it.

This book may fundamentally change the way you work and lead your organization.

Perhaps one of most challenging questions Drucker asks the reader is:

Do we produce results that are sufficiently outstanding for us to justify putting our resources in this area

Because, Drucker argues that need alone does not justify continuing.  Nor does tradition, if your results are not sufficiently outstanding.

If you volunteer for a nonprofit or are seeking employment at a nonprofit, this book is also an insightful and inspiring read.

Definitions Of Key Business Terms

In Company Culture, Customer Service, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Management, Mission Statement, Motivating Employees, Team Building on September 29, 2010 at 7:48 pm

We talk about, read about and hear about “customers,” “mission,” and “customer value” all the time and perhaps sometimes we struggle with fully understanding the best definition of those terms.

I like Peter F. Drucker’s definitions:

Customers — Those who must be satisfied in order for the organization to achieve results.  The primary customer is the person whose life is changed through the organization’s work.  Supporting customers are volunteers, members, partners, funders, referral sources, employees, and others who must be satisfied.

Customer Value — That which satisfied customers’ needs (physical and psychological well-being), wants (where, when, and how service is provided), and aspirations (desired long-term results).

Mission — Why you do what you do; the organization’s reason for being, its purpose.  Says what, in the end, you want to be remembered for.

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