Eric Jacobson

Archive for the ‘Leadership Training’ Category

10 Tips For How To Be A Better Leader

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training on May 9, 2016 at 1:36 am

Here are 10 behaviors, techniques and tips you can use to be an effective leader:

  1. Respond to questions quickly and fully.
  2. Take an interest in your employees and their personal milestone events.
  3. Give feedback in a timely manner and make it individualized and specific.
  4. Be willing to change your decisions.
  5. End every meeting with a follow-up To Do list.
  6. Support mentoring — both informal and formal.
  7. Don’t delay tough decisions.
  8. Do annual written performance appraisals.
  9. Explain how a change will affect employee’s feelings before, during and after the change is implemented.
  10. Have face-to-face interaction as often as possible.

How To Be A Level 5 Leader

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Jim Collins, Leadership, Leadership Training, Leadership Traits on September 24, 2014 at 5:53 am

Author and leadership expert Jim Collins defines Level 5 leaders as those who:

  • Pursue goals with the ferocity of lions while displaying the humility of lambs.

According to Collins, who has studied leadership for 25 years, this level of leader is a rare breed. This is a leader who:

  • bestows credit generously
  • shoulders blame responsibility
  • puts organization before self

The First-Time Manager

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Leadership Versus Management, Management, Management Versus Leadershp on December 12, 2013 at 7:44 am

First-Time Manager

AMACOM’s (of the American Management Association) sixth edition of the best-selling book, The First-Time Manager — originally published in 1981 is a must-read for new managers and leaders in business.

The book covers eight core responsibilities of a new manager, including:

  • Hiring
  • Communicating
  • Planning
  • Organizing
  • Training
  • Monitoring
  • Evaluating
  • Firing

Expert advice is additionally provided regarding:

  • Using Your New Authority
  • Managing Your Mood
  • Building Trust

One of my favorite sections of the book is the one about class in a manager:

  • Class is treating people with dignity.
  • Class does not have to be the center of attention.
  • Class does not lose its cool.
  • Class does not rationalize mistakes.
  • Class is good manners.
  • Class means loyalty to one’s staff.
  • Class recognizes the best way to build oneself is to first build others.
  • Class leads by example.
  • Class does not taken action when angry.
  • Class is authentic and works hard at making actions consistent with words.

The First-Time Manager is an excellent how-to guide for anyone new to managing people.

Other books for new managers include any from the Top 20 list of Leadership Books, as voted on by LinkedIn Linked 2 Leadership group members, who were asked the question:

What’s the first leadership book you would give to a new manager?

Leadership Book Highlights: The Way Of The SEAL

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Leadership Traits, Leading By Example, Navy SEAL on December 5, 2013 at 7:41 am

Way Of The Seal

Want to be a leader who is tough? Cool under fire? Able to sense danger before it’s too late? In The Way of the SEAL, ex-Navy SEAL Commander Mark Divine reveals exercises, meditations, and focusing techniques to train your mind for mental toughness, emotional resilience, and uncanny intuition.

Along the way Divine teaches you how to reaffirm your ultimate purpose, define your most important goals, and take concrete steps to make them happen.

A practical guide for businesspeople or anyone who wants to be an elite operator in life, this book will teach you how to:

  • Lead from the front, so that others will want to work for you
  • Practice front-sight focus, the radical ability to focus on one thing until victory is achieved
  • Think offense, all the time, to eradicate fear and indecisiveness
  • Smash the box and be an unconventional thinker so you’re never thrown off-guard by chaotic conditions
  • Access your intuition so you can make “hard right” decisions
  • Achieve twenty times more than you think

Blending the tactics he learned from America’s elite force with lessons from the Spartans, samurai, Apache scouts, and other great warrior traditions, Divine has distilled the fundamentals of success into eight powerful principles that will help you transform into an effective leader.

A native of Oneida County, New York, Mark Divine served in the U.S. Navy SEALs for 20 years, retiring as a commander, and holds an MBA from New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business.

Allyson Edelhertz Machate, who assisted Divine in writing the book, is a Phi Beta Kappa member and the founder of Ambitious Enterprises, an award-winning business that offers expert writing and editorial services to business professionals, publishers, agents, and authors. A New York native, she leads a team of content professionals from her home near Baltimore, Maryland.

Watch Divine Talk About How Negativity Destroys Performance: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iU40ik5br_4

What To Do During Your First 100 Days As A New Leader

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Management on November 3, 2013 at 6:08 am

There are seven major onboarding land mines that you are likely to come across as a new leader and there are specific points in the first 100 days where you are most likely to encounter them, explain authors:

  • George Brant
  • Jayme A. Check
  • Jorge Pedraza

…in their new third edition of, The New Leader’s 100-Day Action Plan.

Ill-prepared, without a plan, and lacking proper onboarding, the land mines will get you.  And, if you miss one or more of the critical tasks that must be accomplished in your first 100 days, you’ll likely fail.

The book is packed with:

  • Examples and case studies
  • Action plans
  • Tools, techniques and tricks of the trade

The authors also explain why you need to start even before your official first day on the job. For example:

  • Cultural engagement is extremely important in a successful transition; and it is essential that you know what your cultural engagement plan will be before walking in the door for Day One.
  • A new leader’s role begins as soon as you are an acknowledged candidate for the job. Everything you do and say and don’t do and don’t say will send powerful signals, starting well before you even walk in the door on Day One.

By Day 30 share with your team:

  • Mission — Why here, why exist, what business are we in?
  • Vision — Future picture – what we want to become; where we are going.
  • Values — Believes and moral principles that guide attitudes, decisions, and actions.
  • Objectives — Broadly defined, qualitative performance requirements.
  • Goals — The quantitative measures of the objectives that define success.
  • Strategies — Broad choices around how the team will achieve its objectives.
  • Plans — The most important projects and initiatives that will bring each strategy to fruition.

By Day 60:

  • Overinvest in early wins to build team confidence.

This must-read book for anyone in a new leadership role also includes:

  • A new approach called BRAVE on how to engage hearts and minds in the intended culture.
  • A 100-Hour Action Plan for crisis situations.

Book Highlights: The First-Time Manager

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Leadership Traits on August 31, 2013 at 8:31 pm

First-Time Manager

AMACOM’s (of the American Management Association) sixth edition of the best-selling book, The First-Time Manager — originally published in 1981 is a must-read for new managers and leaders in business.

The book covers eight core responsibilities of a new manager, including:

  • Hiring
  • Communicating
  • Planning
  • Organizing
  • Training
  • Monitoring
  • Evaluating
  • Firing

Expert advice is additionally provided regarding:

  • Using Your New Authority
  • Managing Your Mood
  • Building Trust

One of my favorite sections of the book is the one about class in a manager:

  • Class is treating people with dignity.
  • Class does not have to be the center of attention.
  • Class does not lose its cool.
  • Class does not rationalize mistakes.
  • Class is good manners.
  • Class means loyalty to one’s staff.
  • Class recognizes the best way to build oneself is to first build others.
  • Class leads by example.
  • Class does not taken action when angry.
  • Class is authentic and works hard at making actions consistent with words.

The First-Time Manager is an excellent how-to guide for anyone new to managing people.

Other books for new managers include any from the Top 20 list of Leadership Books, as voted on by LinkedIn Linked 2 Leadership group members, who were asked the question:

What’s the first leadership book you would give to a new manager?

A Different Way To Ask For Customer Feedback

In Customer Engagement, Customer Service, Effective Communications, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Listening Skills, Management on August 9, 2013 at 6:24 am

Eric Jacobson Leadership

Consider this advice from author Paul R. Timm.  He recommends a different twist on asking your customers questions:

  • stop asking your customers the “typical” questions and instead ask them open-ended questions.

Here’s specifically what Timm recommends:

Don’t Ask:

  • How was everything?
  • Can I get you something else?
  • Did you find everything you need?
  • Will that be all?
  • Was everything satisfactory?

Instead Ask:

  • What else can I do for you?
  • What else can I get for you?
  • What else can I help you with?
  • What else could we do to better serve you?
  • How else can we be of help?

These open-ended questions will let your customers really express their ideas, opinions and needs.  Timm is the author of, 50 Powerful Ideas You Can Use To Keep Your Customers.

Leadership Quotes From Manager 3.0

In Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Training, Management, Manager 3.0 on July 2, 2013 at 6:11 am

manager30

These five quotes from the new book released this week, Manager 3.0, really impress and inspire me:

“The leader is the person who brings a little magic to the moment.” — Denise Morrison

“The task of leadership is not to put greatness into people, but to elicit it, for the greatness is there already.” — John Buchan

“The ones who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones that do.” — Apple Inc.

“The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place,” — George Bernard Shaw.

“Twenty years from now you will more be disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did.” — Mark Twain

Manager 3.0 is a management book tailored specifically for young business leaders and provides them with the tools to bridge generation gaps in the workplace and gain awareness of other’s differences and their own.

It’s authored by Brad Karsh and Courtney Templin, both of JB Training Solutions.

Book Review: Change-friendly Leadership

In Company Culture, Corporate Culture, Effective Communications, Employee Satisfaction, Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Quotes, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Leading By Example, Management, Motivating Employees, Setting Goals, Team Building on November 18, 2012 at 10:27 am

Because Dr. Rodger Dean Duncan delivers so much timely, straight-forward and relevant wisdom in his new book, Change-friendly Leadership, reading it is like talking with your trusted best friend. Or, listening to your favorite teacher.  Or, soaking in the thoughts from your respected mentor.

That’s why you’ll want to spend plenty of time reading the book.  Reflecting on the messages.  Absorbing the discussion,  And, then likely re-reading it.  Or, at least certain sections.

Duncan demonstrates in the book how humanness, approachability, and friendliness are necessary but often overlooked elements of making change successful in an organization.

He teaches leaders the foundation for effectively engaging people’s heads, hearts and hopes — all necessary to enable effective and lasting (sustainable) change in today’s constantly changing world.  Duncan refers to this as leading the whole person.

According to Duncan:

  • Change must accommodate people’s feelings–feelings that involve trust, confidence, passion, and all those other intangible but very real things that make us human.

Duncan’s change-friendly leadership approach includes knowing how to leverage the Champions, Agents, Sponsors and Targets within your organization.  And, how to combine tough love elements into the process while always operating from a platform of respect and caring, not intimidation and contention.

Readers will appreciate the “Bonus Points” offerings at the end of each major section of the book where they learn how to access free white papers, diagnostic tools, videos and other items by going to a URL or using a QR code via their Smart phone.

You’ll also likely enjoy as I did all the great leadership quotes sprinkled throughout the book, such as these:

  • Losing good people is costly.  But the number one most expensive thing that can happen to your organization is for your best and most capable people to quit and stay.
  • It’s often the stress that people resist, not the change itself.
  • A transactional leader focuses on routine and regimented activities.  A transformational leader focuses primarily on initiating and “managing” change.
  • It is not the strongest of the species that survive, not the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change — Charles Darwin.
  • The key to change is to let go of fear — Roseanne Cash
  • Amateurs practice until they get it right.  Professionals practice until they can’t get it wrong.

Thanks to Cave Henricks for sending me an advance copy of the book.

Book Review: Practice Perfect

In Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Management, Setting Goals, Team Building on October 23, 2012 at 9:06 pm

42 Rules For Getting Better At Getting Better is the sub-title of the new book, Practice Perfect.

This is an interesting book because it is co-authored by three teachers and clearly it’s a book for and about teachers.

But, as the authors remind us, as leaders, we are also teachers.  And, that’s why Practice Perfect is a valuable read for everyone who wants to help their employees grow and excel through practice.

And, although there’s a handy three-page summary of the 42 rules toward the end of the book, take the time to read about each rule covered in the chapters:

  • Rethinking Practice
  • How To Practice
  • Using Modeling
  • Feedback
  • Culture of Practice
  • Post-Practice: Making New Skills Stick

Key lessons and takeaways for me from the book include the following tips for providing effective feedback when working with someone who is practicing a skill:

  • Correct instead of critique.
  • Ask participants to redo an action differently or better rather than just telling them whether or how it could have been different.
  • Focus on the solution rather than the problem.
  • Give feedback right away, even if it’s imperfect.
  • Remember that a simple and small change, implemented the right away, can be more effective than a complex rewiring of a skill.

Additional advice from the authors is that:

  • The more consistently you give and get feedback, the more normal it is.
  • What people do right is as important in practice as what they do wrong.
  • Coaching during a game/exercise can be helpful, but teaching during a game/exercise is distracting and counterproductive.

Practice Perfect‘s authors are Doug Lemov, Katie Yezzi and Erica Woolway.  Lemov’s previous book is Teach Like a Champion.

Finally, the book is packed with stories of practice masters like Coach John Wooden, surgeon Atul Gawande, and basketball star Michael Jordan.

Thanks to the book publisher for sending me an advance copy of the book.

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