Eric Jacobson

Archive for the ‘Leadership Education’ Category

How To Move Your Company Forward

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Inc. Magazine, Leadership, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills on May 27, 2016 at 5:23 am

The April 2014 issue of Inc. magazine featured a fascinating list of 35 questions from business owners, entrepreneurs and management thinkers. Each offered the one question they would ask to move a company forward.

From the list, my favorites are:

  • Are we relevant?  Will we be relevant five years from now? Ten?
  • What prevents me from making the changes I know will make me a more effective leader?
  • Are we changing as fast as the world around us?
  • Who, on the executive team or the board, has spoken to a customer recently?

And, my most favorite is:

  • How can we become the company that would put us out of business?

What question do you ask to help move your company forward?

Book Highlights: The Little Book Of Leadership Development

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education on July 5, 2014 at 7:21 pm

The authors of the above pictured leadership book suggest that readers don’t read their book cover to cover.  But, if you’re like me, you’ll read the book that way.  That’s because I found, The Little Book of Leadership Development, by Scott J. Allen and Mitchell Kusy, a compelling read, packed with practical tips and techniques for both leading and helping others to learn how to lead effectively.

What you’ll find is basically 50 one- to two-page chapters, each highlighting a leadership tip.  Some tips seem easy and no-brainers.  Others are more difficult to implement.  But, even the “easy” ones are surprisingly absent from many organizations, so they are well worth a reminder of what to do and how to do it correctly.

Here are some of my favorite parts of the book that highlight the keen observations by the authors:

  • As a leader, if you are active, involved, and perceived by members of your team as an individual who care about their development and growth, you will increase your chances of success and theirs.
  • Your team needs to know your expectations, goals, vision, and, most important, how each individual adds value.
  • Rewards and recognition are particularly effective when the award was developed by team members and represent peer-to-peer recognition.
  • Nothing is more frustrating than working for a manager who does not communicate organizational or community information.
  • When you have no new news, letting your team know that you have nothing to report lets the team know you haven’t forgotten about them.
  • Coaching works best when you set clear expectations and stretch goals; challenge and support; monitor performance; provide feedback in small, concrete chunks; follow up consistently.
  • At all times, everyone on your team should be working on a least one project that is taking their skills to the next level.
  • Adults learn best through reflection.
  • Encourage team members to debate all sides of an issue intellectually and they will be more apt to think more innovatively than those who view an issue in a dualistic–absolute right or wrong — manner.
  • The more often your team members hear a consistent message, the more likely they will understand that what you are saying is important and credible.
  • Create a culture where, if someone complains, they know that they will be expected to be part of the solution.
  • Great leaders are great teachers.

This book seems ideal for busy managers who don’t have lots of time to read leadership books.  It’s only 132 pages.  And, it would be a great first book to share with managers new to their leadership role.

The First-Time Manager

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Leadership Versus Management, Management, Management Versus Leadershp on December 12, 2013 at 7:44 am

First-Time Manager

AMACOM’s (of the American Management Association) sixth edition of the best-selling book, The First-Time Manager — originally published in 1981 is a must-read for new managers and leaders in business.

The book covers eight core responsibilities of a new manager, including:

  • Hiring
  • Communicating
  • Planning
  • Organizing
  • Training
  • Monitoring
  • Evaluating
  • Firing

Expert advice is additionally provided regarding:

  • Using Your New Authority
  • Managing Your Mood
  • Building Trust

One of my favorite sections of the book is the one about class in a manager:

  • Class is treating people with dignity.
  • Class does not have to be the center of attention.
  • Class does not lose its cool.
  • Class does not rationalize mistakes.
  • Class is good manners.
  • Class means loyalty to one’s staff.
  • Class recognizes the best way to build oneself is to first build others.
  • Class leads by example.
  • Class does not taken action when angry.
  • Class is authentic and works hard at making actions consistent with words.

The First-Time Manager is an excellent how-to guide for anyone new to managing people.

Other books for new managers include any from the Top 20 list of Leadership Books, as voted on by LinkedIn Linked 2 Leadership group members, who were asked the question:

What’s the first leadership book you would give to a new manager?

Leadership Book Highlights: The Way Of The SEAL

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Leadership Traits, Leading By Example, Navy SEAL on December 5, 2013 at 7:41 am

Way Of The Seal

Want to be a leader who is tough? Cool under fire? Able to sense danger before it’s too late? In The Way of the SEAL, ex-Navy SEAL Commander Mark Divine reveals exercises, meditations, and focusing techniques to train your mind for mental toughness, emotional resilience, and uncanny intuition.

Along the way Divine teaches you how to reaffirm your ultimate purpose, define your most important goals, and take concrete steps to make them happen.

A practical guide for businesspeople or anyone who wants to be an elite operator in life, this book will teach you how to:

  • Lead from the front, so that others will want to work for you
  • Practice front-sight focus, the radical ability to focus on one thing until victory is achieved
  • Think offense, all the time, to eradicate fear and indecisiveness
  • Smash the box and be an unconventional thinker so you’re never thrown off-guard by chaotic conditions
  • Access your intuition so you can make “hard right” decisions
  • Achieve twenty times more than you think

Blending the tactics he learned from America’s elite force with lessons from the Spartans, samurai, Apache scouts, and other great warrior traditions, Divine has distilled the fundamentals of success into eight powerful principles that will help you transform into an effective leader.

A native of Oneida County, New York, Mark Divine served in the U.S. Navy SEALs for 20 years, retiring as a commander, and holds an MBA from New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business.

Allyson Edelhertz Machate, who assisted Divine in writing the book, is a Phi Beta Kappa member and the founder of Ambitious Enterprises, an award-winning business that offers expert writing and editorial services to business professionals, publishers, agents, and authors. A New York native, she leads a team of content professionals from her home near Baltimore, Maryland.

Watch Divine Talk About How Negativity Destroys Performance: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iU40ik5br_4

What To Do During Your First 100 Days As A New Leader

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Management on November 3, 2013 at 6:08 am

There are seven major onboarding land mines that you are likely to come across as a new leader and there are specific points in the first 100 days where you are most likely to encounter them, explain authors:

  • George Brant
  • Jayme A. Check
  • Jorge Pedraza

…in their new third edition of, The New Leader’s 100-Day Action Plan.

Ill-prepared, without a plan, and lacking proper onboarding, the land mines will get you.  And, if you miss one or more of the critical tasks that must be accomplished in your first 100 days, you’ll likely fail.

The book is packed with:

  • Examples and case studies
  • Action plans
  • Tools, techniques and tricks of the trade

The authors also explain why you need to start even before your official first day on the job. For example:

  • Cultural engagement is extremely important in a successful transition; and it is essential that you know what your cultural engagement plan will be before walking in the door for Day One.
  • A new leader’s role begins as soon as you are an acknowledged candidate for the job. Everything you do and say and don’t do and don’t say will send powerful signals, starting well before you even walk in the door on Day One.

By Day 30 share with your team:

  • Mission — Why here, why exist, what business are we in?
  • Vision — Future picture – what we want to become; where we are going.
  • Values — Believes and moral principles that guide attitudes, decisions, and actions.
  • Objectives — Broadly defined, qualitative performance requirements.
  • Goals — The quantitative measures of the objectives that define success.
  • Strategies — Broad choices around how the team will achieve its objectives.
  • Plans — The most important projects and initiatives that will bring each strategy to fruition.

By Day 60:

  • Overinvest in early wins to build team confidence.

This must-read book for anyone in a new leadership role also includes:

  • A new approach called BRAVE on how to engage hearts and minds in the intended culture.
  • A 100-Hour Action Plan for crisis situations.

Book Highlights: The First-Time Manager

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Leadership Traits on August 31, 2013 at 8:31 pm

First-Time Manager

AMACOM’s (of the American Management Association) sixth edition of the best-selling book, The First-Time Manager — originally published in 1981 is a must-read for new managers and leaders in business.

The book covers eight core responsibilities of a new manager, including:

  • Hiring
  • Communicating
  • Planning
  • Organizing
  • Training
  • Monitoring
  • Evaluating
  • Firing

Expert advice is additionally provided regarding:

  • Using Your New Authority
  • Managing Your Mood
  • Building Trust

One of my favorite sections of the book is the one about class in a manager:

  • Class is treating people with dignity.
  • Class does not have to be the center of attention.
  • Class does not lose its cool.
  • Class does not rationalize mistakes.
  • Class is good manners.
  • Class means loyalty to one’s staff.
  • Class recognizes the best way to build oneself is to first build others.
  • Class leads by example.
  • Class does not taken action when angry.
  • Class is authentic and works hard at making actions consistent with words.

The First-Time Manager is an excellent how-to guide for anyone new to managing people.

Other books for new managers include any from the Top 20 list of Leadership Books, as voted on by LinkedIn Linked 2 Leadership group members, who were asked the question:

What’s the first leadership book you would give to a new manager?

5 Traits For Effective Leadership

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Traits, Management on July 13, 2013 at 7:26 am

 Eric Jacobson Leadership

I was recently asked, “What five most important traits must a leader have to be effective?”  I could reply fairly quickly, but I did take a moment to remember that when I asked a similar question in a LinkedIn group discussion, group members offered up nearly 100 different adjectives to describe an effective leader. 

But, for me, I contend the five most important traits are:

  1. Good communicator. That means effectively communicating timely and consistent messages during good and bad times. And, knowing how and when to be a good listener. Communicating is critical. Employees must hear from their leaders. And, hearing from their leaders in person versus e-mail and written memos is even more effective.
  2. Being a servant leader. Put your employees and your company first. A top manager who makes decisions that are self-serving will lack followers and will bring the company down.
  3. Adaptable. Today, more than ever, a leader needs to adapt. That means adapting to competitive and industry situations. It also means being willing to change your decisions if new information or circumstances warrant the change.
  4. Decisive. Leaders who aren’t decisive and who can’t make a decision will spin their organization into a frozen state where employees are unmotivated, wasting time, and discouraged.
  5. Motivating. Smart, decisive, engaging, tough yet fair, personable and encouraging leaders are motivating. These leaders motivate employees to deliver their best for their leaders and for their company.

What is your list of five traits?

Leadership Quotes From Manager 3.0

In Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Training, Management, Manager 3.0 on July 2, 2013 at 6:11 am

manager30

These five quotes from the new book released this week, Manager 3.0, really impress and inspire me:

“The leader is the person who brings a little magic to the moment.” — Denise Morrison

“The task of leadership is not to put greatness into people, but to elicit it, for the greatness is there already.” — John Buchan

“The ones who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones that do.” — Apple Inc.

“The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place,” — George Bernard Shaw.

“Twenty years from now you will more be disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did.” — Mark Twain

Manager 3.0 is a management book tailored specifically for young business leaders and provides them with the tools to bridge generation gaps in the workplace and gain awareness of other’s differences and their own.

It’s authored by Brad Karsh and Courtney Templin, both of JB Training Solutions.

Leadership Quotes For Today

In Customer Engagement, Customer Service, Engaging Customers, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, General Leadership Skills, Guiding Business Principles, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Quotes, Leadership Skills, Management on March 23, 2013 at 11:59 am

Eric Jacobson Leadership

In addition to learning a lot about the ways businesses are creating experiences for their customers in Brian Solis’ new book, What’s The Future of Business, you’ll be treated to dozens of compelling leadership, life and business quotes, such as these:

  • “People never learn anything by being told, they have to find out for themselves.” — Paulo Coelho

 

  •  “We live in a time where brands are people and people are brands.” — Brian Solis

 

  • “In real life, the most practical advice for leaders is not to treat pawns like pawns, nor princes like princes, but all persons like persons.” — James MacGregor Burns

 

  •  “The only source of knowledge is experience.” — Albert Einstein

 

  • “Nothing is a waste of time if you use the experience wisely.” — Auguste Rodin

 

  • “Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending.” — Maria Robinson

How To Give Constructive Feedback — 4 Steps

In Constructive Feedback, Effective Communications, Employee Engagement, Employee Feedback, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Feedback, Leadership, Leadership Education, Motivating Employees on January 22, 2013 at 6:00 pm

Effective Listening

Eric Harvey and Al Lucia wrote a booklet called, 144 Ways To Walk The Talk. They provide the following great advice about giving feedback:

1. Make it timely — give your feedback as soon as possible to the performance.

2. Make it individualized — tailor your feedback to the feedback receiver.

3. Make it productive — focus your feedback on the performance and not the performer.

4. Make is specific — pinpoint for the receiver observable actions and behaviors.

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