Eric Jacobson

Archive for the ‘Leadership Books’ Category

How To Be A Manager With Class

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books on July 26, 2017 at 4:59 am

AMACOM’s (of the American Management Association) sixth edition of the best-selling book, The First-Time Manager — originally published in 1981 is a must-read for new managers and leaders in business.

One of my favorite sections of the book is the one about class in a manager:

  • Class is treating people with dignity.
  • Class does not have to be the center of attention.
  • Class does not lose its cool.
  • Class does not rationalize mistakes.
  • Class is good manners.
  • Class means loyalty to one’s staff.
  • Class recognizes the best way to build oneself is to first build others.
  • Class leads by example.
  • Class does not taken action when angry.
  • Class is authentic and works hard at making actions consistent with words.

Leadership Quotes From, Just Listen

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Quotes on July 17, 2017 at 6:19 am

Here are some terrific quotes from Mark Goulston‘s book, Just Listen:

  • Good management is the art of making problems so interesting and their solutions so constructive that everyone wants to get to work and deal with them. — Paul Hawken
  • Life is mostly a matter of perception and more often misperception. — Dave Logan
  • Everyone has an invisible sign hanging from their next saying, “Make me feel important.” — Mary Kay Ash
  • Do the unexpected. The expected is boring.  The expected is tuned out. — Steve Strauss
  • Humility is the surest sign of strength. — Thomas Merton
  • Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning. — Bill Gates
  • The secret of getting ahead is getting started. — Agatha Christie
  • Don’t find fault.  Find a remedy. — Henry Ford

16 Ways To Build Trust

In Building Trust, Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Trust Building on July 2, 2017 at 10:40 am

You can’t lead if your employees, team or followers don’t trust you.

Building trust takes energy, effort and constant attention to how you act.

To help build trust, follow these 16 tips, recommended by author Susan H. Shearouse:

  1. Be honest
  2. Keep commitments and keep your word
  3. Avoid surprises
  4. Be consistent with your mood
  5. Be your best
  6. Demonstrate respect
  7. Listen
  8. Communicate
  9. Speak with a positive intent
  10. Admit mistakes
  11. Be willing to hear feedback
  12. Maintain confidences
  13. Get to know others
  14. Practice empathy
  15. Seek input from others
  16. Say “thank you”

Identifying Emerging Talent

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Talent on June 20, 2017 at 5:58 pm

From the book, Mastering the Challenges of Leading Change, comes this useful checklist from author H. James Dallas for how to identify and develop emerging talent in your company/organization.

Dallas recommends that each question should be graded on a scale of 1 to 3, with 3 being the best. Use the questions and the scoring for you and your employee to work together toward the highest ratings across the board.

  1. Has the person demonstrated a “getting lost with confidence” mind-set?
  2. Does the person communicate with authenticity?
  3. Has the person created a strong personal brand that is recognized by colleagues of all levels?
  4. Does the person know his or her blind spots and have people watching to prevent him or her from crashing?
  5. Is the person getting exposure to executive management?
  6. Does the person seek out and seriously consider advice?
  7. Is the person building an inclusive team and sponsoring others?
  8. Is the person proactive in finding opportunities to initiate and lead change?

How To Be Humble

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Humble Leader, Leadership, Leadership Books on May 28, 2017 at 3:31 pm

From John Blakey‘s book, The Trusted Executive, here are these four tips from Jim Collins for how to be a humble leader:

  1. Demonstrate a compelling modesty, shunning public adulation and never be boastful.
  2. Act with quiet, calm determination and motivate others through inspired standards, not inspiring charisma.
  3. Channel ambition into the company, not the self, and set up successors for even more greatness in the next generation.
  4. Look in the mirror, not out of the window, when apportioning responsibility for poor performance.

The Seven Roles Of A Collaborative Leader

In Collaboration, Collaborative Leader, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books on May 13, 2017 at 11:07 am

Edward M. Marshall’s book, Transforming The Way We Work — The Power Of The Collaborative Workplace, remains relevant today, more than a decade after Marshall wrote it.

Particularly useful is the book’s section that teaches readers how to be a collaborative leader.

Marshall says that there are seven different, important roles and responsibilities of collaborative leaders when leading teams, and those leaders should select the appropriate style to meet the team’s needs.

The seven roles are:

  1. The leader as sponsor — You provide strategic direction, boundaries and coaching for the team. You also monitor progress and ensure integrity in the team’s operating processes.
  2. The leader as facilitator — You ensure that meetings, team dynamics, and interpersonal relationships function effectively. You also ensure internal coordination of activities among team members.
  3. The leader as coach — You provide support and guidance and you serve as a sounding board.
  4. The leader as change agent/catalyst — You hold team members accountable, make the unpopular decisions, energize the group to action and enable breakthroughs where possible.
  5. The leader as healer — You play the role of the mediator and serve as the catalyst to bring people together.
  6. The leader as member — You serve as part of the team, taking full responsibility for the success of the team and actively participate in the team’s activities.
  7. The leader as manager/administrator — You serve in a traditional role of tackling the daily administrative responsibilities, processes, and systems essential to managing the boundaries within the larger organization or key stakeholders.

Within any collaborate workplace, leaders will find themselves fulfilling all seven of these roles at different times, and sometimes fulfilling a combination of the seven styles at the same time, while working with work groups and teams.

Four years after Marshall wrote, Transforming The Way We Work, he penned, Building Trust At the Speed Of Change. Marshall won an award for excellence in organization development from the American Society for Training and Development.

How To Connect With Individual Team Members

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books, Teams on April 8, 2017 at 1:37 pm

Here, from the book, Be A Network Marketing Leader, are some tips on how, as a leader, you can connect with your individual team members:

  • Send cards on their birthdays and anniversary-of-joining dates.
  • Keep yourself updated with what’s happening in their personal lives.
  • Show your support during personal or family crises.
  • Schedule weekly one-on-one phone calls or meetings.
  • Pay attention. When you see an increase, decrease or change in results, get in touch.
  • Schedule monthly whole team meetings.
  • Applaud achievements and address concerns immediately.
  • Be consistent.
  • Make frequent thoughtful, spontaneous gestures.

How To Build A Good Culture For A Digital Team

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books on February 12, 2017 at 7:29 am

About two years ago, Shane Atchison and Jason Burby wrote an interesting book about the principals needed for delivering true business value in digital marketing.

One of the most helpful sections of the book, Does it Work?, is the list of elements they believe are the most important for building a good culture where a digital team can be flexible, work together great, and move seamlessly to new ideas and process.

Those elements are:

  • Stay flexible. Encourage thinking outside roles. Don’t let job titles limit individual contributions.
  • Hire learners. Your team should be curious and willing to learn new things.
  • Empower people to share. Everyone’s opinion matters.
  • Make sure problems come with solutions. Don’t let whiners complain about what is wrong without bringing proposed solutions to address the problem.
  • Foster a culture of achievement. Provide real data that clearly demonstrates to your team that they are making a difference and accomplishing something.

10 Questions Every Leader Should Ask

In Eric Jacobson Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books on January 28, 2017 at 10:22 am

Here are 10 important questions business leaders should ask, according to Ken Blanchard and Garry Ridge, authors of Helping People Win At Work:

  1. Does my business have a clear, meaningful, and easily understood vision/mission?
  2. Do I have the right people in the right seats on the bus?
  3. Do I have a BHAG (big hairy audacious goal), and have I communicated it to my employees?
  4. Are my values driving the behavior I want in my organization?
  5. Am I creating a culture that increases employee engagement?
  6. Am I cultivating a spirit of internal and external learning?
  7. Do my employees know what an A looks like, and am I supporting them to get that A?
  8. Are our products/services creating lasting, positive memories for our customers?
  9. Do I have the best, most timely data and information to help my business make good decisions?
  10. Are our key performance indicators the right ones, and are we measuring what matters?

And, one more questions to ask is:

  • Do we celebrate success?

How To Be A Collaborative Leader

In Collaboration, Collaborative Leader, Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books on January 2, 2017 at 7:37 am

Edward M. Marshall’s book, Transforming The Way We Work — The Power Of The Collaborative Workplace, remains relevant today, more than a decade after Marshall wrote it.

Particularly useful is the book’s section that teaches readers how to be a collaborative leader.

Marshall says that there are seven different, important roles and responsibilities of collaborative leaders when leading teams, and those leaders should select the appropriate style to meet the team’s needs.

The seven roles are:

  1. The leader as sponsor — You provide strategic direction, boundaries and coaching for the team. You also monitor progress and ensure integrity in the team’s operating processes.
  2. The leader as facilitator — You ensure that meetings, team dynamics, and interpersonal relationships function effectively. You also ensure internal coordination of activities among team members.
  3. The leader as coach — You provide support and guidance and you serve as a sounding board.
  4. The leader as change agent/catalyst — You hold team members accountable, make the unpopular decisions, energize the group to action and enable breakthroughs where possible.
  5. The leader as healer — You play the role of the mediator and serve as the catalyst to bring people together.
  6. The leader as member — You serve as part of the team, taking full responsibility for the success of the team and actively participate in the team’s activities.
  7. The leader as manager/administrator — You serve in a traditional role of tackling the daily administrative responsibilities, processes, and systems essential to managing the boundaries within the larger organization or key stakeholders.

Within any collaborate workplace, leaders will find themselves fulfilling all seven of these roles at different times, and sometimes fulfilling a combination of the seven styles at the same time, while working with work groups and teams.

Four years after Marshall wrote, Transforming The Way We Work, he penned, Building Trust At the Speed Of Change. Marshall won an award for excellence in organization development from the American Society for Training and Development. He holds degrees from Claremont McKenna College, Syracuse University and the University of North Carolina.

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