Eric Jacobson

Archive for the ‘Guiding Business Principles’ Category

Inspiring Leadership Quotes

In Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Guiding Business Principles, Leadership, Leadership Quotes, Management on July 21, 2013 at 9:50 am

LeadershipJacobson

These quotes truly inspire me:

“The three common characteristics of best companies — they care, they have fun, they have high performance expectations.” — Brad Hams

“The one thing that’s common to all successful people: They make a habit of doing things that unsuccessful people don’t like to do.” — Michael Phelps

“It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.” — Harry S. Truman

“The leader of the past was a person who knew how to tell. The leader of the future will be a person who knows how to ask.” — Peter Drucker

“Leadership: The art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” — Dwight D. Eisenhower

“Good leadership isn’t about advancing yourself. It’s about advancing your team.” — John C. Maxwell

“People buy into the leader, then the vision.” — John C. Maxwell

“Great leaders have courage, tenacity and patience.” — Bill McBean

“People never learn anything by being told, they have to find out for themselves.” — Paulo Coelho

“We live in a time where brands are people and people are brands.” — Brian Solis

“In real life, the most practical advice for leaders is not to treat pawns like pawns, nor princes like princes, but all persons like persons.” — James MacGregor Burns

“The only source of knowledge is experience.” — Albert Einstein

“Nothing is a waste of time if you use the experience wisely.” — Auguste Rodin

“Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending.” — Maria Robinson

“A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” — Arnold H. Glasgow

“I praise loudly, I blame softly.” — Catherine II of Russia

“Honest disagreement is often a good sign of progress.” — Mohandas Gandhi

“A long dispute means that both parties are wrong.” — Voltaire

“The least questioned assumptions are often the most questionable.” — Paul Broca

“One of the tests of leadership is the ability to recognize a problem before it becomes an emergency.” — Arnold Glasow

“Managers assert drive and control to get things done; leaders pause to discover new ways of being and achieving .”– Kevin Cashman

“It doesn’t matter where you’re coming from. All that matters is where you are going to.” — Stephen Covey

“Great works are performed not by strength, but by perseverance.” — Samuel Johnson

“Strength doesn’t come from what we can do. It comes from overcoming what we once thought we couldn’t.” — Rikki Roberts

“The art of progress is to preserve order amid change and to preserve change amid order.” — Alfred North Whitehead

“The most powerful predictable people builders are praise and encouragement.” — Brian Tracy

“Few things help an individual more than to place responsibility upon them and to let them know that and trust them.” — Booker T. Washington

“Ask because you want to know. Listen because you want to grow.” — Mark Scharenbroich

“If you want execution, hail only success. If you want creativity, hail risk, and remain neutral about success.” — Marcus Buckingham

“To get the best coaching outcomes, always have your 1-on-1’s on your employee’s turf not yours. In your office the truth hides.” — Marcus Buckingham

“The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” — Alan Kay

“Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

“A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.” — Winston Churchill

“I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.” — Bill Cosby

“The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fall.” — Vince Lombardi

USAA’s 10 Guiding Business Principles

In Company Culture, Corporate Culture, Customer Service, General Leadership Skills, Guiding Business Principles, Leadership, Management on May 14, 2013 at 5:48 am

list

I really like these 10 guiding business principles that San Antonio, TX headquartered insurance company USAA lives by:

  • Exceed customer expectations
  • Live the Golden Rule (treat others with courtesy and respect)
  • Be a leader
  • Participate and contribute
  • Pursue excellence
  • Work as a team
  • Share knowledge
  • Keep it simple (make it easy for customers to do business with us and for us to work together)
  • Listen and communicate
  • Have fun

Too many companies don’t make it simple for their customers to do business with them.  Is it easy for your customers to:

  • Buy from you?
  • Make returns?
  • Get pricing and terms?
  • Receive timely responses to their e-mails?
  • Quickly get answers when phoning your company?

You can find more examples of companies with impressive guiding principles in the book, 1001 Ways To Energize Employees.

Leadership, Motivational And Life Quotes That Inspire Me

In Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, General Leadership Skills, Guiding Business Principles, Leadership, Leadership Quotes, Management, Quotes That Inspire on March 24, 2013 at 12:34 pm

LeadershipJacobson

These quotes truly inspire me:

“The three common characteristics of best companies — they care, they have fun, they have high performance expectations.” — Brad Hams

“The one thing that’s common to all successful people: They make a habit of doing things that unsuccessful people don’t like to do.” — Michael Phelps

“It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.” — Harry S. Truman

“The leader of the past was a person who knew how to tell. The leader of the future will be a person who knows how to ask.” — Peter Drucker

“Leadership: The art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” — Dwight D. Eisenhower

“Good leadership isn’t about advancing yourself. It’s about advancing your team.” — John C. Maxwell

“People buy into the leader, then the vision.” — John C. Maxwell

“Great leaders have courage, tenacity and patience.” — Bill McBean

“People never learn anything by being told, they have to find out for themselves.” — Paulo Coelho

“We live in a time where brands are people and people are brands.” — Brian Solis

“In real life, the most practical advice for leaders is not to treat pawns like pawns, nor princes like princes, but all persons like persons.” — James MacGregor Burns

“The only source of knowledge is experience.” — Albert Einstein

“Nothing is a waste of time if you use the experience wisely.” — Auguste Rodin

“Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending.” — Maria Robinson

“A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” — Arnold H. Glasgow

“I praise loudly, I blame softly.” — Catherine II of Russia

“Honest disagreement is often a good sign of progress.” — Mohandas Gandhi

“A long dispute means that both parties are wrong.” — Voltaire

“The least questioned assumptions are often the most questionable.” — Paul Broca

“One of the tests of leadership is the ability to recognize a problem before it becomes an emergency.” — Arnold Glasow

“Managers assert drive and control to get things done; leaders pause to discover new ways of being and achieving .”– Kevin Cashman

“It doesn’t matter where you’re coming from. All that matters is where you are going to.” — Stephen Covey

“Great works are performed not by strength, but by perseverance.” — Samuel Johnson

“Strength doesn’t come from what we can do. It comes from overcoming what we once thought we couldn’t.” — Rikki Roberts

“The art of progress is to preserve order amid change and to preserve change amid order.” — Alfred North Whitehead

“The most powerful predictable people builders are praise and encouragement.” — Brian Tracy

“Few things help an individual more than to place responsibility upon them and to let them know that and trust them.” — Booker T. Washington

“Ask because you want to know. Listen because you want to grow.” — Mark Scharenbroich

“If you want execution, hail only success. If you want creativity, hail risk, and remain neutral about success.” — Marcus Buckingham

“To get the best coaching outcomes, always have your 1-on-1’s on your employee’s turf not yours. In your office the truth hides.” — Marcus Buckingham

“The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” — Alan Kay

“Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

“A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.” — Winston Churchill

“I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.” — Bill Cosby

“The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fall.” — Vince Lombardi

Leadership Quotes For Today

In Customer Engagement, Customer Service, Engaging Customers, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, General Leadership Skills, Guiding Business Principles, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Quotes, Leadership Skills, Management on March 23, 2013 at 11:59 am

Eric Jacobson Leadership

In addition to learning a lot about the ways businesses are creating experiences for their customers in Brian Solis’ new book, What’s The Future of Business, you’ll be treated to dozens of compelling leadership, life and business quotes, such as these:

  • “People never learn anything by being told, they have to find out for themselves.” — Paulo Coelho

 

  •  “We live in a time where brands are people and people are brands.” — Brian Solis

 

  • “In real life, the most practical advice for leaders is not to treat pawns like pawns, nor princes like princes, but all persons like persons.” — James MacGregor Burns

 

  •  “The only source of knowledge is experience.” — Albert Einstein

 

  • “Nothing is a waste of time if you use the experience wisely.” — Auguste Rodin

 

  • “Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending.” — Maria Robinson

Leadership Lessons From “Moral Of The Story”

In Company Culture, Corporate Culture, Effective Communications, Employee Engagement, General Leadership Skills, Guiding Business Principles, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Quotes, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Leading By Example, Management, Motivating Employees on September 6, 2012 at 5:19 pm

I’m a big fan of best-selling author Harvey Mackay.  He writes about business, sales and leadership and typically ends his articles with a moral of the story.

Culled from his writings of the past three and half years, here are some of my favorites of his moral of the story endings:

  • Change your thinking, change your life.
  • It’s not enough to know how to do things – you must know why you do them.
  • If you live in the past, you won’t have much of a future.
  • If you want to outsmart the competition, you have to outthink the competition.
  • Don’t be afraid to make a decision.  Be afraid not make a decision.
  • What you learn on your first job will last through your last job.
  • Minds are like parachutes – not much good unless they are open.
  • If you can’t be an expert, hire one.
  • People have a way of becoming what you encourage them to be.
  • It only takes a little spark to ignite a great fire.
  • Doing the right thing is never the wrong thing to do.

Mackay’s best-selling business books have sold more than 10 million copies worldwide. They have been translated into 37 languages and sold in 80 countries.

Swim With the Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive was a groundbreaking New York Times #1 best seller for 54 weeks.

Book Review: The Art Of Being Unresonable By Eli Broad

In Employee Engagement, Employee Satisfaction, General Leadership Skills, Guiding Business Principles, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Quotes, Leadership Skills, Leading By Example, Management, Motivating Employees on June 8, 2012 at 7:38 pm

Early on in Eli Broad’s new book, The Art of Being Unresaonable, he reminds us of the power of a child’s instinctive asking, “Why not?”  Unfortunately, most adults lose that habit and Broad goes on to explain that it was his continuing to ask “Why not?” throughout his career that brought him success.

The questions you’re willing to ask when others think they have all the answers are doors to discovery,” says Broad.

Other words of wisdom from the book, and my favorite takeaways, include:

  • Most successful businesses have to begin by bucking conventional wisdom.  Invention and innovation don’t happen without it.
  • Do your homework no matter how much time it takes.
  • Big ideas don’t happen in a moment.
  • You can’t do it all yourself, so ask questions and delegate.
  • The trick to delegating is to make sure your employees share your priorities.
  • Find the best people to whom you can delegate, and know their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Younger employees simply have fewer preconceived ideas of what they can and can’t do.  Try to widen their perspective, deepen their sense of accomplishment, and build their capacity.
  • No matter how much money your customers have, they still want value.
  • The best way to mentor is to challenge people and then to set an example by letting them see you in action.
  • When you challenge people to dig deep and do more and better than even they imagined they could, it creates a particular bond.
  • Show me a person with an unblemished track record, and I’ll show you a person who has dramatically underachieved.

Broad’s book, subtitled, Lessons in Unconventional Thinking, is well worth the read.

Broad is an entrepreneur, philanthropist, and the founder of two Fortune 500 companies — KB Home and SunAmerica.

Thanks to the book’s publisher for sending me an advance copy of the book.

Example Of 10 Guiding Business Principles

In Company Culture, General Leadership Skills, Guiding Business Principles, Leadership, Leadership Education, Leading By Example on April 1, 2012 at 7:08 am

I really like these 10 guiding business principles that San Antonio, TX headquartered insurance company USAA lives by:

  • Exceed customer expectations
  • Live the Golden Rule (treat others with courtesy and respect)
  • Be a leader
  • Participate and contribute
  • Pursue excellence
  • Work as a team
  • Share knowledge
  • Keep it simple (make it easy for customers to do business with us and for us to work together)
  • Listen and communicate
  • Have fun

 

Example Of Good Guiding Business Principles

In Company Culture, General Leadership Skills, Guiding Business Principles, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Leading By Example, Making Decisions on March 1, 2012 at 9:25 pm

I really like these 10 guiding business principles that San Antonio, TX headquartered insurance company USAA lives by:

  • Exceed customer expectations
  • Live the Golden Rule (treat others with courtesy and respect)
  • Be a leader
  • Participate and contribute
  • Pursue excellence
  • Work as a team
  • Share knowledge
  • Keep it simple (make it easy for customers to do business with us and for us to work together)
  • Listen and communicate
  • Have fun

Too many companies don’t make it simple for their customers to do business with them.  Is it easy for your customers to:

  • Buy from you?
  • Make returns?
  • Get pricing and terms?
  • Receive timely responses to their e-mails?
  • Quickly get answers when phoning your company?

You can find more examples of companies with impressive guiding principles in the book, 1001 Ways To Energize Employees.

%d bloggers like this: