Eric Jacobson

Archive for the ‘Employee Satisfaction’ Category

Six Questions To Ask Your Employees Today

In Constructive Feedback, Effective Communications, Employee Engagement, Employee Feedback, Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership on September 23, 2017 at 8:41 am

question mark people

As explained in John Baldoni’s, book, Lead With Purpose, Marshall Goldsmith suggests all leaders make it a habit to regularly ask their employees these six questions:

  1. Where do you think we should be going?
  2. Where do you think you and your part of the business should be going?
  3. What do you think you’re doing well?
  4. If you were the leader, what ideas would you have for you?
  5. How can I help?
  6. What suggestions or ideas do you have for me?

The Six Questions Leaders Should Ask Employees

In Employee Engagement, Employee Feedback, Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Leadership on August 20, 2017 at 9:35 am

As explained in John Baldoni‘s, book, Lead With PurposeMarshall Goldsmith suggests all leaders make it a habit to regularly ask their employees these six questions:

  1. Where do you think we should be going?
  2. Where do you think you and your part of the business should be going?
  3. What do you think you’re doing well?
  4. If you were the leader, what ideas would you have for you?
  5. How can I help?
  6. What suggestions or ideas do you have for me?

8 Ways To Show You Value Your Employees

In Employee Engagement, Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Eric Jacobson Leadership, Value Employees on February 16, 2017 at 5:50 am

There are eight specific actions business leaders can take to show that they value their employees, according to Andrew Leigh, author of the bookEthical Leadership — Creating and Sustaining an Ethical Business Culture.

Those eight behaviors are:

  1. Attention — Pay attention to what people say to show your interest.
  2. Listen — Make time to hear what colleagues, peers and employees have to say to show you care.
  3. Positive Language — Find words and phrases to show employees they’re needed.  Examples are, “We couldn’t have accomplished this without you,” “That was really useful.”
  4. Document — Put praise in writing to increase its impact.  Make clear where the credit belongs.
  5. Micro Sessions — Create two-way communication sessions.
  6. Visits — Schedule visits to teams and work areas.
  7. Stories — Share stories that highlight unusual contributions and provide your personal response to them.
  8. Invite — Ask people to contact you directly with their issues and concerns — not to bypass the normal channels, but in addition to those channels. Then, set up systems to respond quickly and positively when people show the courage to contact you direct.

Leigh is a founder of Maynard Leigh Associates the United Kingdom development company.

He is author of over 20 books on management, many translated around the world. His book, Charisma, has been translated into over 17 languages and his long running Essentials of Management was short-listed for Book of Year award by the Chartered Institute of Management.

Originally trained as an economist, Leigh has an MA in the field of Human Resources, and is a Chartered Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

6 Questions To Ask Your Employees

In Employee Engagement, Employee Feedback, Employee Satisfaction, Eric Jacobson Leadership, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership on June 14, 2016 at 4:09 am

As explained in John Baldoni‘s, book, Lead With Purpose, Marshall Goldsmith suggests all leaders make it a habit to regularly ask their employees these six questions:

  1. Where do you think we should be going?
  2. Where do you think you and your part of the business should be going?
  3. What do you think you’re doing well?
  4. If you were the leader, what ideas would you have for you?
  5. How can I help?
  6. What suggestions or ideas do you have for me?

The Exit Interview

In Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Exit Interviews, Human Resources on January 30, 2016 at 6:55 am

Knowing why an employee leaves your company can help you to reduce your employee turnover rate.

That’s because you can use the reasons a departing employee provides to gather information about processes, people and departments that might need some redirection to correct situations that may have contributed to the employee’s reasons for leaving.

So, do an exit interview whenever possible with each departing employee. Ask each person:

  • Why they are leaving
  • What they liked about their job
  • What they would have changed about their job
  • How they felt about the cooperation level among co-workers
  • How they felt about communication and interaction with co-workers
  • Whether they received the necessary training to do their job
  • Whether they received frequent coaching and balanced feedback from their supervisor
  • Would they recommend a friend apply for work at your company
  • How they felt about their pay
  • How they would describe the morale in the company and in their department
  • What they would change about their department and the company
  • Whether they received the necessary information to perform their job effectively

You can find other great advice about exit interviews in the book, The Essential HR Handbook, written by Sharon Armstrong and Barbara Mitchell. The book is a quick and handy resource for any leader, manager or Human Resource professional.

Ask Your Employees These Six Questions Often

In Employee Engagement, Employee Feedback, Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on August 20, 2014 at 7:57 pm

As explained in John Baldoni’s, book, Lead With Purpose, Marshall Goldsmith suggests all leaders make it a habit to regularly ask their employees these six questions:

  1. Where do you think we should be going?
  2. Where do you think you and your part of the business should be going?
  3. What do you think you’re doing well?
  4. If you were the leader, what ideas would you have for you?
  5. How can I help?
  6. What suggestions or ideas do you have for me?

How To Keep Employees Engaged

In Employee Engagement, Employee Satisfaction, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on March 10, 2014 at 9:48 am

Overland Park, Kansas-based author Leigh Branham, along with Mark Hirschfeld, awhile back completed a survey of 10,000 employees in 43 states to better understand what separates a “best places to work” company from other companies.

What Branham and Hirschfeld discovered is that the best companies use six “universal drivers” that maximize employee engagement:

  1. Caring, Competent, and Engaging Senior Leaders
  2. Effective Managers Who Keep Employees Aligned and Engaged
  3. Effective Teamwork at All Levels
  4. Job Enrichment and Professional Growth
  5. Valuing Employee Contributions
  6. Concern for Employee Well-Being

Branham also explains that to get the best from your employees you need to re-engage them. You can learn more about how to do that in his book, Re-Engage.

Brian Tracy Releases New Pocket-Sized Motivation Guide For Leaders

In Brian Tracy, Effective Communications, Employee Satisfaction, Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Management, Motivating Employees, Motivation on May 28, 2013 at 8:41 pm

motivation

All you need is one hour to read Brian Tracy‘s newest, pocket-sized guide for managers, Motivation.

“You cannot motivate other people,” explains Tracy, “but you can remove the obstacles that stop them from motivating themselves.  All motivation is self-motivation.  As a manager, you can create an environment where this potential for self-motivation is released naturally and spontaneously.”

In the book, Tracy presents chapter-by-chapter his 21 most reliable and powerful methods for increasing the effectiveness of any individual or group.

Each chapter includes a couple different action exercises.

Toward the end of the book, Tracy explains the importance of the Friendship Factor in motivating employees.  “Every manager can tap into the power of friendship in everyday employee interactions by remembering the three Cs:  Consideration, Caring and Courtesy.

  • Practice consideration by expressing an interest in your employees as individuals.
  • Express caring for your staff members by listening attentively and with compassion.
  • Express courtesy toward employees by showing personal regard and respect for each person — especially under stress, when a situation goes wrong, or when a worker makes a mistake.

“Your job as a manager is to make sure that you are getting along well with all of your employees and they are all getting along well with you,” stresses Tracy.

Culture Is Every Employee’s Responsibility At SWA

In Company Culture, Corporate Culture, Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Engaging Customers, Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on May 27, 2013 at 10:20 am

Eric Jacobson Leadership

If you’ve flown Southwest Airlines you know they’re tops in airline customer service, driven by a leadership style that creates a company-wide culture where all employees own that culture.

According to SWA Chairman, President and CEO Gary Kelly, as reported in the company’s in-flight magazine, “every company has a culture, whether that culture is supportive or stifling, active or passive, fun or discouraging.”

“One way we do culture differently is by making Southwest’s culture everyone’s responsibility. In fact, we ask everyone to ‘own it,'” says Kelly.

Here are some of the ways that SWA keeps its winning culture in the forefront that you can also do to keep employees motivated and to drive great customer service:

1.  Form a corporate culture committee and a local culture committee that organizes low-cost employee events throughout the year.

2.  Include a section related to culture on each employee’s annual performance appraisal.  This goes for every employee in your company, including the entire management team.

3.  Explain your company’s culture on the first day of each new hire’s orientation and training.

4.  Foster a culture that encourages celebration.

National Volunteer Week — Encourage Your Employees To Volunteer

In Employee Retention, Employee Satisfaction, Engaging Employees, Eric Jacobson On Corporate Culture, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Management, Motivating Employees, Volunteering on April 23, 2013 at 5:56 am

National Volunteer Week is April 21-27.  The week when nonprofit organizations throughout the U.S. will celebrate and honor their volunteers.

If you are not already volunteering, what a great time to start.

And, if you are a workplace leader who supports a volunteer program at your business, you already know that by encouraging employees to give back to your community you are:

  • building teamwork
  • motivating employees
  • attracting new hires

In fact, job seekers much prefer companies that have a strong volunteer program. And, a growing number of businesses are rewarding employees who volunteer by giving them extra vacation time and other incentives.

Fortunately, throughout the U.S. there are hundreds of volunteer opportunities where employees can contribute individually, or where leaders can organize teams of employees to volunteer together on a routine and scheduled basis.

To find organizations in need of volunteers, go to Volunteer Match and type in your zip code.  You’ll be presented a list of nearby volunteer opportunities.  Also, you can find opportunities on iParticipate.

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