Eric Jacobson

Archive for the ‘E-mail Communication’ Category

8 Tips For Using Email Effectively

In E-mail Communication, Eric Jacobson Leadership on January 4, 2015 at 5:26 pm

To help your organization, here are some simple rules for emailing from C. Elliott Haverlack’s new book, Unbundle It:

  1. Never send an email when you are angry.
  2. Never address a sensitive or emotionally charged topic via email.
  3. Eliminate the use of return receipts.
  4. Mandate that “Reply All” emails are not allowed.
  5. Eliminate one word emails.
  6. Be cognizant of string or multiple message emails.
  7. Ensure emails requiring a response are addressed promptly.
  8. Do not expect answers on emails from carbon copy recipients.

6 Tips For Improving Your eMail Messages

In E-mail Communication, Eric Jacobson On Leadership on August 23, 2014 at 9:41 am

Author Joseph McCormack offers these six tips for ways of making your written communication shorter and more appealing:

  1. Deliver a strong title or subject line that’s your invitation.
  2. Limit your email to the original window.
  3. Make sure there is white space and balance throughout the text.
  4. Call out key ideas by calling them out in bold type.
  5. Start each bullet point with a strong word or catchy phrase.
  6. Trim the fluff — anything that’s unnecessary, leaving a consumable and concise size communication

You can learn more helpful tips in his new book, Brief:  Make a Bigger Impact by Saying Less.

 

How To Make E-mail Communication More Effective In The Workplace

In Company Culture, E-mail Communication, Effective Communications, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Skills, Management on February 9, 2012 at 9:02 pm

Are you leading an organization where e-mail communication is ineffective?

Here are some wise guidelines that Verizon Wireless has used to promote effective, efficient and responsible e-mail use within its company.

You can find these guidelines in the book, Managers, Can You Hear Me Now?, written by Denny F. Strigl, former CEO and President of Verizon Wireless.

  • E-mail should bring closure to work, not create more work.
  • Before you write an e-mail, ask yourself if calling or visiting the recipient will bring better communication.
  • Keep e-mails short.  Make your point in just the subject line or the space in the preview pane.
  • Don’t assume other people are staring at their screens, waiting for your e-mail.
  • If just one person needs information or clarification, don’t send your e-mail to a group.
  • Never send e-mail when you’re angry.
  • Assume anything you put in writing will be leaked to the press or to your competitors.
  • Stay accountable.  Sending an e-mail doesn’t transfer responsibility.
  • E-mail is never an acceptable excuse for not getting something done.  If you need a reply to an e-mail before you can do your job, get the information another way.
  • Don’t spend more than five minutes dealing with an e-mail.  When you go over this limit, stop and make a phone call.
  • Don’t judge how much you’ve accomplished by how many e-mails you’ve sent.

Answers To A Leader’s 5 Most Pressing Communications Challenges

In E-mail Communication, Effective Communications, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Leadership Training, Management on September 16, 2011 at 4:20 am

Leadership communications expert David Grossman recently answered what I believe are some of the most pressing communications challenges leaders face today:

  • How to present to a diverse employee audience with a single presentation
  • How often a leader should communicate
  • What’s the best way to deliver bad news
  • How to be sure employees receive a consistent message when leaders must rely on middle managers to deliver it
  • How to effectively communicate via e-mail versus phone

David’s answers, published in his blog today on his website, are straight-forward, practical and actionable.  And, that’s what I like most about David’s approach — in his books, on his blog and via his speaking engagements.

Thanks David!

Best Practices Guidelines For Effective E-mail Communication

In Company Culture, E-mail Communication, Effective Communications, General Leadership Skills, Leadership, Leadership Books, Leadership Education, Leadership Skills, Management on April 28, 2011 at 6:51 pm

Are you leading an organization where e-mail communication is ineffective?

Here are some wise guidelines that Verizon Wireless has used to promote effective, efficient and responsible e-mail use within its company.  You can find these guidelines in the new book, Managers, Can You Hear Me Now?, written by Denny F. Strigl, former CEO and President of Verizon Wireless.

  • E-mail should bring closure to work, not create more work.
  • Before you write an e-mail, ask yourself if calling or visiting the recipient will bring better communication.
  • Keep e-mails short.  Make your point in just the subject line or the space in the preview pane.
  • Don’t assume other people are staring at their screens, waiting for your e-mail.
  • If just one person needs information or clarification, don’t send your e-mail to a group.
  • Never send e-mail when you’re angry.
  • Assume anything you put in writing will be leaked to the press or to your competitors.
  • Stay accountable.  Sending an e-mail doesn’t transfer responsibility.
  • E-mail is never an acceptable excuse for not getting something done.  If you need a reply to an e-mail before you can do your job, get the information another way.
  • Don’t spend more than five minutes dealing with an e-mail.  When you go over this limit, stop and make a phone call.
  • Don’t judge how much you’ve accomplished by how many e-mails you’ve sent.
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