Eric Jacobson

Archive for the ‘Communication’ Category

The Golden Rules Of Effective Communication

In Communication, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Management on September 20, 2017 at 9:11 am

Here are the 12 golden rules of effective communication from Paul Falcone, as highlighted in his book, 2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals.

Always remember to:

  1. Recognize achievements and accomplishments often.
  2. Celebrate success.
  3. Deliver bad news quickly, constructively, and in a spirit of professional development.
  4. Praise in public, censure in private.
  5. Assume responsibility for problems when things go wrong, and provide immediate praise and recognition to others when things go right.
  6. Create a work environment based on inclusiveness, welcoming others’ suggestions and points of view.
  7. Listen actively, making sure that your people feel heard and understood and have a voice in terms of offering positive suggestions in the office or on the shop floor.
  8. Share information openly (to the extent possible) so that staff members understand the Why behind your reasoning and can ask appropriate questions as they continue along in their own path of career development and learning.
  9. Remember that thankfulness and appreciation are the two most important values you can share with our employees and teach them to live by: make them the core foundation of your culture.
  10. Put others’ needs ahead of your own and expect them to respond in kind (a.k.a. “selfless leadership,” otherwise known as “servant leadership”).
  11. When dealing with others’ shortcomings, always err on the side of compassion.
  12. Solicit ongoing feedback and suggestions form your team in terms of how you could do things differently, thereby stimulating creativity and innovation.

How To Communicate In Eight Seconds

In Communication, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership on August 30, 2017 at 2:42 pm

According to a 2015 Microsoft study, the average attention span for us ever-scattered humans is now shorter that a goldfish’s; eight seconds. So, how do you stand out? How do you communicate effectively? How do you not waste time?

Paul Hellman answers these questions and gives you 100 fast and actionable tactics to make your eights seconds meaningful. It’s all in his new book, You’ve Got 00:00:08 Seconds.

He teaches you three key ingredients:

  1. Focus: How to say less with more meaning.
  2. Variety: How to stand out as slightly different.
  3. Presence. How to be notable and boost your reputation.

Paul Hellman

His tactics will serve you well in all these types of situations:

  • Making presentations
  • Interviewing
  • Emailing
  • Networking
  • Storytelling
  • Leaving voice mail

Here are some of my favorite takeaways from Hellman’s book:

  • In one-to-one conversations, talk less than the other person. Ask at least one thought-provoking question per conversation.
  • In meetings, speak in 30-60 second bites. Provide the headline news first, with details later, and only give details if asked. You’ll be surprised by how much you can say in 30 seconds.
  • When presenting, slim down to 10 PowerPoint slides or less.

And, if you really want to Own the Room when presenting, Hellman recommends you:

  1. Avoid the podium.
  2. Move.
  3. When you get a question, step forward toward the audience.
  4. Keep your hands in front of your body.
  5. Gesture.
  6. Look at individuals.
  7. Speak louder (as though the room were twice as large and you wanted to be heard).
  8. Speak as though your message matters.

12 Rules For How To Effectively Communicate

In Communication, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership on May 17, 2017 at 11:42 am

Here are the 12 golden rules of effective communication from Paul Falcone, as highlighted in his book, 2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals.

Always remember to:

  1. Recognize achievements and accomplishments often.
  2. Celebrate success.
  3. Deliver bad news quickly, constructively, and in a spirit of professional development.
  4. Praise in public, censure in private.
  5. Assume responsibility for problems when things go wrong, and provide immediate praise and recognition to others when things go right.
  6. Create a work environment based on inclusiveness, welcoming others’ suggestions and points of view.
  7. Listen actively, making sure that your people feel heard and understood and have a voice in terms of offering positive suggestions in the office or on the shop floor.
  8. Share information openly (to the extent possible) so that staff members understand the Why behind your reasoning and can ask appropriate questions as they continue along in their own path of career development and learning.
  9. Remember that thankfulness and appreciation are the two most important values you can share with our employees and teach them to live by: make them the core foundation of your culture.
  10. Put others’ needs ahead of your own and expect them to respond in kind (a.k.a. “selfless leadership,” otherwise known as “servant leadership”).
  11. When dealing with others’ shortcomings, always err on the side of compassion.
  12. Solicit ongoing feedback and suggestions form your team in terms of how you could do things differently, thereby stimulating creativity and innovation.

Book Highlights: Leadership Conversations

In Communication, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Books on October 30, 2016 at 3:15 pm

When I read business books, I turn the corner of every page that has something I really like, want to remember and easily reference in the future.

Halfway into the 300-page book, Leadership Conversations, I had turned the corners of nearly every fifth page. So, you can see why I believe this is such a good book. There is so much to learn from Leadership Conversations. It’s a must read for today’s business leaders. Leaders who are leading multi-generational workforces. And, leaders who want the skills to get promoted and move up the corporate ladder.

Authors Alan S. Berson and Richard G. Stieglitz wrote the book because they believe that a leader’s most powerful skill is the ability to hold effective conversations.

So, in their book, they detail the four types of conversations every leader must effectively master.  Conversations that:

  • Build relationships
  • Develop others
  • Make decisions
  • Take action

And, they provide real-world examples and tactical guidance for each of those conversation types.

Here are some of the book’s gems:

The breadth and depth of how leaders connect with people determine a leader’s ability to influence, and the greater the influence, the greater the alignment and results. Leaders who effectively make those people connections:

  • Have a style and a voice that fit their organization and enable them to form bonds with their followers and ignite their passion.
  • Beget great followers. Leaders learn their people’s objectives and guide them toward achieving their full potential.
  • Address small conflicts to avoid larger ones later. They know intuitively when things do not seem right, and promptly hold the conversations required to fix them.
  • Know that creativity cannot be forced. They enable creativity in the natural flow of business by providing the time, the space, and the conditions for people to be creative — then they cultivate the fledgling sprouts of innovation.
  • Celebrate their people. They are liberal with praise and realize that their personal success is rooted in their people’s successes.

How To Flag To Be A Better Communicator

In Communication on May 6, 2014 at 7:48 am

Author Joseph McCormack explains the power of flagging in his new book, Brief.


Flagging is simply calling out the number of key ideas you want to share.  This is a powerful way to grab and hold people’s attention.  The three reasons flagging is so effective are:

  1. Establish logic and simplicity.  It makes it easier for both you and your audience to stay on track.
  2. Provide balance and order.  There is a clear expectation of how much your audience needs to listen and how you are progressing.
  3. Keep the audience connected.  The audience stays engaged because they know where they are, like chapters in a book.

 

How To Listen And Learn

In Communication, Eric Jacobson On Leadership, Leadership, Listening Skills on December 3, 2013 at 7:01 am

In John Baldoni’s new bookThe Leader’s Guide to Speaking with Presence, he provides these tips for listening as a leader and learning as a leader:

When Listening As A Leader:

  • Look at people when they are speaking to you. Make eye contact.
  • Ask open-ended questions, such as “Tell me about…” or “Could you explain this?”
  • Consider the “what if” question:  “What if we looked at the situation like this?”
  • Leverage the “why” question:  “Why do we do it this way?”
  • Employ the “how” question:  “How can you do this?”

When Learning As A Leader:

  • Reflect on what people have told you.
  • Think about what you have not observed.  Are people holding back?  If so, why?
  • Consider how you can implement what you have observed.
  • Get back to people who have suggested ideas to you and thank them.
  • Look for opportunities to collaborate with others.

For nearly 20 years, Baldoni has coached and consulted for a number of leading companies in a variety of different businesses, ranging from automotive and banking to computers, high technology, fast food, and packaged goods.

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